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Course 1 Exam 1

 
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For twenty one years Dilmah has offered consumers the first producer owned, garden fresh, unblended, ethical and single origin tea. On the 21st Anniversary of Dilmah we restate our commitment to the family values on which Merrill J. Fernando founded his brand.

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Exam 1

 

For twenty one years Dilmah has offered consumers the first producer owned, garden fresh, unblended, ethical and single origin tea. On the 21st Anniversary of Dilmah we restate our commitment to the family values on which Merrill J. Fernando founded his brand.

 

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1.1 The Nursery A tea bush can produce tea for up to 70 years but yields tend to reduce after around 50 years. Hence the need to replace older plants, as well as plants which have been affected by disease, with young plants. Until some fifty years ago, tea plants were raised from tea seeds that were known as seedlings. Each plantation grew its own seed bearers in tea trees, which can grow to a height of about 50 feet (15m). metres). Since then young plants have been raised from cuttings obtained from a mother bush, which is a strong, rich plant specifically selected for propagation. The cuttings are planted in polythene sleeves filled with soil.  Watering and shading the new plants is important, yet it is equally important not to over shade or overwater the cuttings.  Bracken shades are often used to shade the young plants and protect them from the wind, while irrigation trenches are dug to provide water. When the plants are approximately 9 to 12 months* of age, they are ready to be re-planted in the tea fields. Great care is taken to prepare the soil in the areas due to be re-planted to prevent the spread of diseases and to ensure that the soil is as fertile as possible.

1. Tea Garden

1.1 The Nursery

A tea bush can produce tea for up to 70 years but yields tend to reduce after around 50 years. Hence the need to replace older plants, as well as plants which have been affected by disease, with young plants.

Until some fifty years ago, tea plants were raised from tea seeds that were known as seedlings. Each plantation grew its own seed bearers in tea trees, which can grow to a height of about 50 feet (15m). metres). Since then young plants have been raised from cuttings obtained from a mother bush, which is a strong, rich plant specifically selected for propagation. The cuttings are planted in polythene sleeves filled with soil. Watering and shading the new plants is important, yet it is equally important not to over shade or overwater the cuttings. Bracken shades are often used to shade the young plants and protect them from the wind, while irrigation trenches are dug to provide water.

When the plants are approximately 9 to 12 months* of age, they are ready to be re-planted in the tea fields. Great care is taken to prepare the soil in the areas due to be re-planted to prevent the spread of diseases and to ensure that the soil is as fertile as possible.

 
1.1 The Nursery A tea bush can produce tea for up to 70 years but yields tend to reduce after around 50 years. Hence the need to replace older plants, as well as plants which have been affected by disease, with young plants. Until some fifty years ago, tea plants were raised from tea seeds that were known as seedlings. Each plantation grew its own seed bearers in tea trees, which can grow to a height of about 50 feet (15m). metres). Since then young plants have been raised from cuttings obtained from a mother bush, which is a strong, rich plant specifically selected for propagation. The cuttings are planted in polythene sleeves filled with soil.  Watering and shading the new plants is important, yet it is equally important not to over shade or overwater the cuttings.  Bracken shades are often used to shade the young plants and protect them from the wind, while irrigation trenches are dug to provide water. When the plants are approximately 9 to 12 months* of age, they are ready to be re-planted in the tea fields. Great care is taken to prepare the soil in the areas due to be re-planted to prevent the spread of diseases and to ensure that the soil is as fertile as possible. <!–nextpage–> <!– /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:Latha; panose-1:2 11 6 4 2 2 2 2 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:swiss; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-2146435069 0 0 0 1 0;} @font-face {font-family:”Cambria Math”; panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:1; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-format:other; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:0 0 0 0 0 0;} @font-face {font-family:Calibri; panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:swiss; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-1610611985 1073750139 0 0 159 0;} /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-unhide:no; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:””; margin-top:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-bottom:10.0pt; margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:”Calibri”,”sans-serif”; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Latha; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi; mso-bidi-language:AR-SA;} .MsoChpDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; mso-default-props:yes; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Latha; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi; mso-ansi-language:EN-GB; mso-bidi-language:AR-SA;} .MsoPapDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; margin-bottom:10.0pt; line-height:115%;} @page Section1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in; mso-header-margin:.5in; mso-footer-margin:.5in; mso-paper-source:0;} div.Section1 {page:Section1;} –>

1.2 Cultivation

The young plants that have been carefully nurtured in nurseries for up to a year are then re-planted in especially prepared fields following the natural contours of the land, or sometimes, on specially prepared terraces to help irrigation and to prevent erosion. The plants are planted 3 to 5 feet (1 to 1.5 metres) apart. The tea plant is adaptable to a wide range of climates and soils provided there is abundant and evenly distributed rainfall (not less than about 85 inches/216cm). Manuring periodically, either with artificial or cattle manure is necessary in order to preserve the bushes in a healthy and vigorous condition. Maintaining soil condition is a vital element to tea propagation.

It takes approximately two to three years, depending on the elevation and climatic conditions, before these plants are ready to produce tea. During this period, the plants will undergo a process known as Pruning which helps it to develop in to a fully fledged high-yielding tea bush.

<!-nextpage->

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1.3 Pruning

When the young plant develops to a height of about half a metre above ground level, it is cut back (i.e. pruned) to within a few inches off the ground to set it on course to develop into a flat-topped bush.

Once fully developed, a tea bush is approximately 3 ½ feet (1m) in height, and continues to be pruned in cycles of 1-2 years at low altitude and 3-5 years at higher altitudes. The timing of pruning is also dependent on the rainfall, as it is essential that there is sufficient moisture in the soil.

Therefore, the three principle objectives for cyclical pruning of fully developed and yielding tea bushes are:

i. To stimulate shoot growth – The tea bush is pruned to encourage the growth of new shoots or ‘flush’. Regular pruning also prevents flowering and fruit formation. Additionally, pruning creates a wider flat-top bush which in turn increases the number of plucking points per tea bush.

ii. To maintain a healthy frame

iii. To maintain a convenient height for easy harvesting ­– The growth of the tea bush has to be modified in order to create a low, flat, wide bush so as to make it easily accessible for picking.

1. Tea Garden

1.1 The Nursery

A tea bush can produce tea for up to 70 years but yields tend to reduce after around 50 years. Hence the need to replace older plants, as well as plants which have been affected by disease, with young plants.

Until some fifty years ago, tea plants were raised from tea seeds that were known as seedlings. Each plantation grew its own seed bearers in tea trees, which can grow to a height of about 50 feet (15m). metres). Since then young plants have been raised from cuttings obtained from a mother bush, which is a strong, rich plant specifically selected for propagation. The cuttings are planted in polythene sleeves filled with soil. Watering and shading the new plants is important, yet it is equally important not to over shade or overwater the cuttings. Bracken shades are often used to shade the young plants and protect them from the wind, while irrigation trenches are dug to provide water.

When the plants are approximately 9 to 12 months* of age, they are ready to be re-planted in the tea fields. Great care is taken to prepare the soil in the areas due to be re-planted to prevent the spread of diseases and to ensure that the soil is as fertile as possible.

Module 1 Lesson

 
1.1 The Nursery A tea bush can produce tea for up to 70 years but yields tend to reduce after around 50 years. Hence the need to replace older plants, as well as plants which have been affected by disease, with young plants. Until some fifty years ago, tea plants were raised from tea seeds that were known as seedlings. Each plantation grew its own seed bearers in tea trees, which can grow to a height of about 50 feet (15m). metres). Since then young plants have been raised from cuttings obtained from a mother bush, which is a strong, rich plant specifically selected for propagation. The cuttings are planted in polythene sleeves filled with soil.  Watering and shading the new plants is important, yet it is equally important not to over shade or overwater the cuttings.  Bracken shades are often used to shade the young plants and protect them from the wind, while irrigation trenches are dug to provide water. When the plants are approximately 9 to 12 months* of age, they are ready to be re-planted in the tea fields. Great care is taken to prepare the soil in the areas due to be re-planted to prevent the spread of diseases and to ensure that the soil is as fertile as possible. <!–nextpage–> <!– /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:Latha; panose-1:2 11 6 4 2 2 2 2 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:swiss; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-2146435069 0 0 0 1 0;} @font-face {font-family:”Cambria Math”; panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:1; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-format:other; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:0 0 0 0 0 0;} @font-face {font-family:Calibri; panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:swiss; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-1610611985 1073750139 0 0 159 0;} /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-unhide:no; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:””; margin-top:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-bottom:10.0pt; margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:”Calibri”,”sans-serif”; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Latha; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi; mso-bidi-language:AR-SA;} .MsoChpDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; mso-default-props:yes; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Latha; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi; mso-ansi-language:EN-GB; mso-bidi-language:AR-SA;} .MsoPapDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; margin-bottom:10.0pt; line-height:115%;} @page Section1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in; mso-header-margin:.5in; mso-footer-margin:.5in; mso-paper-source:0;} div.Section1 {page:Section1;} –>

1.2 Cultivation

The young plants that have been carefully nurtured in nurseries for up to a year are then re-planted in especially prepared fields following the natural contours of the land, or sometimes, on specially prepared terraces to help irrigation and to prevent erosion. The plants are planted 3 to 5 feet (1 to 1.5 metres) apart. The tea plant is adaptable to a wide range of climates and soils provided there is abundant and evenly distributed rainfall (not less than about 85 inches/216cm). Manuring periodically, either with artificial or cattle manure is necessary in order to preserve the bushes in a healthy and vigorous condition. Maintaining soil condition is a vital element to tea propagation.

It takes approximately two to three years, depending on the elevation and climatic conditions, before these plants are ready to produce tea. During this period, the plants will undergo a process known as Pruning which helps it to develop in to a fully fledged high-yielding tea bush.

<!-nextpage->

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1.3 Pruning

When the young plant develops to a height of about half a metre above ground level, it is cut back (i.e. pruned) to within a few inches off the ground to set it on course to develop into a flat-topped bush.

Once fully developed, a tea bush is approximately 3 ½ feet (1m) in height, and continues to be pruned in cycles of 1-2 years at low altitude and 3-5 years at higher altitudes. The timing of pruning is also dependent on the rainfall, as it is essential that there is sufficient moisture in the soil.

Therefore, the three principle objectives for cyclical pruning of fully developed and yielding tea bushes are:

i. To stimulate shoot growth – The tea bush is pruned to encourage the growth of new shoots or ‘flush’. Regular pruning also prevents flowering and fruit formation. Additionally, pruning creates a wider flat-top bush which in turn increases the number of plucking points per tea bush.

ii. To maintain a healthy frame

iii. To maintain a convenient height for easy harvesting ­– The growth of the tea bush has to be modified in order to create a low, flat, wide bush so as to make it easily accessible for picking.

1. Tea Garden

1.1 The Nursery

A tea bush can produce tea for up to 70 years but yields tend to reduce after around 50 years. Hence the need to replace older plants, as well as plants which have been affected by disease, with young plants.

Until some fifty years ago, tea plants were raised from tea seeds that were known as seedlings. Each plantation grew its own seed bearers in tea trees, which can grow to a height of about 50 feet (15m). metres). Since then young plants have been raised from cuttings obtained from a mother bush, which is a strong, rich plant specifically selected for propagation. The cuttings are planted in polythene sleeves filled with soil. Watering and shading the new plants is important, yet it is equally important not to over shade or overwater the cuttings. Bracken shades are often used to shade the young plants and protect them from the wind, while irrigation trenches are dug to provide water.

When the plants are approximately 9 to 12 months* of age, they are ready to be re-planted in the tea fields. Great care is taken to prepare the soil in the areas due to be re-planted to prevent the spread of diseases and to ensure that the soil is as fertile as possible.

Module 1 Lesson

 

1. Tea Garden

1.1 The Nursery

A tea bush can produce tea for up to 70 years but yields tend to reduce after around 50 years. Hence the need to replace older plants, as well as plants which have been affected by disease, with young plants.

 

Until some fifty years ago, tea plants were raised from tea seeds that were known as seedlings. Each plantation grew its own seed bearers in tea trees, which can grow to a height of about 50 feet (15m). metres). Since then young plants have been raised from cuttings obtained from a mother bush, which is a strong, rich plant specifically selected for propagation. The cuttings are planted in polythene sleeves filled with soil.  Watering and shading the new plants is important, yet it is equally important not to over shade or overwater the cuttings.  Bracken shades are often used to shade the young plants and protect them from the wind, while irrigation trenches are dug to provide water.

 

When the plants are approximately 9 to 12 months* of age, they are ready to be re-planted in the tea fields. Great care is taken to prepare the soil in the areas due to be re-planted to prevent the spread of diseases and to ensure that the soil is as fertile as possible

 

1.2 Cultivation

The young plants that have been carefully nurtured in nurseries for up to a year are then re-planted in especially prepared fields following the natural contours of the land, or sometimes, on specially prepared terraces to help irrigation and to prevent erosion. The plants are planted 3 to 5 feet (1 to 1.5 metres) apart. The tea plant is adaptable to a wide range of climates and soils provided there is abundant and evenly distributed rainfall (not less than about 85 inches/216cm). Manuring periodically, either with artificial or cattle manure is necessary in order to preserve the bushes in a healthy and vigorous condition. Maintaining soil condition is a vital element to tea propagation.

 

It takes approximately two to three years, depending on the elevation and climatic conditions, before these plants are ready to produce tea. During this period, the plants will undergo a process known as Pruning which helps it to develop in to a fully fledged high-yielding tea bush.

 

1.3 Pruning

When the young plant develops to a height of about half a metre above ground level, it is cut back (i.e. pruned) to within a few inches off the ground to set it on course to develop into a flat-topped bush.

 

Once fully developed, a tea bush is approximately 3 ½ feet (1m) in height, and continues to be pruned in cycles of 1-2 years at low altitude and 3-5 years at higher altitudes. The timing of pruning is also dependent on the rainfall, as it is essential that there is sufficient moisture in the soil.

 

Therefore, the three principle objectives for cyclical pruning of fully developed and yielding tea bushes are:

  1. i. To stimulate shoot growth – The tea bush is pruned to encourage the growth of new shoots or ‘flush’. Regular pruning also prevents flowering and fruit formation. Additionally, pruning creates a wider flat-top bush which in turn increases the number of plucking points per tea bush.
  2. ii. To maintain a healthy frame
  3. iii. To maintain a convenient height for easy harvesting ­– The growth of the tea bush has to be modified in order to create a low, flat, wide bush so as to make it easily accessible for picking.

 

1.4 Plucking

The activity of harvesting fresh young shoots from the mature tea bushes is known as plucking or picking. Each pluck takes only the flush of two tender leaves and bud of tender and succulent fresh growth. Within seven to ten days the bushes grow new shoots and are then re-plucked. This skilled job is traditionally carried out by women who are adept at picking the shoots, breaking them off by twisting the leaves and bud with their fingers and deftly throwing handfuls of shoots into the carrier baskets resting on their backs. Taking two leaf shoots and end bud constitutes fine plucking and this forms good quality tea, while four leaves and the bud forms coarse plucking and yields tea of lower quality.

 

Picking is still done by hand in Sri Lanka in order to preserve the quality of the harvest. The pluckers have a daily target of 20kg and are given a bonus for every kilogram over 20kgs that they pluck. Between two and three thousand leaves are needed to produce just one kilo of unprocessed tea, which is an indication of the enormous quantities of leaf that is plucked each day.

 

Once picked, the fresh leaf is weighed and transported to the tea factory.

 

Pages: 1 2

Module 1 Lesson

 
1.1 The Nursery A tea bush can produce tea for up to 70 years but yields tend to reduce after around 50 years. Hence the need to replace older plants, as well as plants which have been affected by disease, with young plants. Until some fifty years ago, tea plants were raised from tea seeds that were known as seedlings. Each plantation grew its own seed bearers in tea trees, which can grow to a height of about 50 feet (15m). metres). Since then young plants have been raised from cuttings obtained from a mother bush, which is a strong, rich plant specifically selected for propagation. The cuttings are planted in polythene sleeves filled with soil.  Watering and shading the new plants is important, yet it is equally important not to over shade or overwater the cuttings.  Bracken shades are often used to shade the young plants and protect them from the wind, while irrigation trenches are dug to provide water. When the plants are approximately 9 to 12 months* of age, they are ready to be re-planted in the tea fields. Great care is taken to prepare the soil in the areas due to be re-planted to prevent the spread of diseases and to ensure that the soil is as fertile as possible. <!– /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:Latha; panose-1:2 11 6 4 2 2 2 2 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:swiss; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-2146435069 0 0 0 1 0;} @font-face {font-family:”Cambria Math”; panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:1; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-format:other; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:0 0 0 0 0 0;} @font-face {font-family:Calibri; panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:swiss; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-1610611985 1073750139 0 0 159 0;} /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-unhide:no; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:””; margin-top:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-bottom:10.0pt; margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:”Calibri”,”sans-serif”; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Latha; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi; mso-bidi-language:AR-SA;} .MsoChpDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; mso-default-props:yes; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Latha; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi; mso-ansi-language:EN-GB; mso-bidi-language:AR-SA;} .MsoPapDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; margin-bottom:10.0pt; line-height:115%;} @page Section1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in; mso-header-margin:.5in; mso-footer-margin:.5in; mso-paper-source:0;} div.Section1 {page:Section1;} –>

1.2 Cultivation

The young plants that have been carefully nurtured in nurseries for up to a year are then re-planted in especially prepared fields following the natural contours of the land, or sometimes, on specially prepared terraces to help irrigation and to prevent erosion. The plants are planted 3 to 5 feet (1 to 1.5 metres) apart. The tea plant is adaptable to a wide range of climates and soils provided there is abundant and evenly distributed rainfall (not less than about 85 inches/216cm). Manuring periodically, either with artificial or cattle manure is necessary in order to preserve the bushes in a healthy and vigorous condition. Maintaining soil condition is a vital element to tea propagation.

It takes approximately two to three years, depending on the elevation and climatic conditions, before these plants are ready to produce tea. During this period, the plants will undergo a process known as Pruning which helps it to develop in to a fully fledged high-yielding tea bush.

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1.3 Pruning

When the young plant develops to a height of about half a metre above ground level, it is cut back (i.e. pruned) to within a few inches off the ground to set it on course to develop into a flat-topped bush.

Once fully developed, a tea bush is approximately 3 ½ feet (1m) in height, and continues to be pruned in cycles of 1-2 years at low altitude and 3-5 years at higher altitudes. The timing of pruning is also dependent on the rainfall, as it is essential that there is sufficient moisture in the soil.

Therefore, the three principle objectives for cyclical pruning of fully developed and yielding tea bushes are:

i. To stimulate shoot growth – The tea bush is pruned to encourage the growth of new shoots or ‘flush’. Regular pruning also prevents flowering and fruit formation. Additionally, pruning creates a wider flat-top bush which in turn increases the number of plucking points per tea bush.

ii. To maintain a healthy frame

iii. To maintain a convenient height for easy harvesting ­– The growth of the tea bush has to be modified in order to create a low, flat, wide bush so as to make it easily accessible for picking.

1. Tea Garden

1.1 The Nursery

A tea bush can produce tea for up to 70 years but yields tend to reduce after around 50 years. Hence the need to replace older plants, as well as plants which have been affected by disease, with young plants.

Until some fifty years ago, tea plants were raised from tea seeds that were known as seedlings. Each plantation grew its own seed bearers in tea trees, which can grow to a height of about 50 feet (15m). metres). Since then young plants have been raised from cuttings obtained from a mother bush, which is a strong, rich plant specifically selected for propagation. The cuttings are planted in polythene sleeves filled with soil. Watering and shading the new plants is important, yet it is equally important not to over shade or overwater the cuttings. Bracken shades are often used to shade the young plants and protect them from the wind, while irrigation trenches are dug to provide water.

When the plants are approximately 9 to 12 months* of age, they are ready to be re-planted in the tea fields. Great care is taken to prepare the soil in the areas due to be re-planted to prevent the spread of diseases and to ensure that the soil is as fertile as possible.

Module 1 Lesson

 
  1. Tea Garden
1.1       The Nursery A tea bush can produce tea for up to 70 years but yields tend to reduce after around 50 years. Hence the need to replace older plants, as well as plants which have been affected by disease, with young plants. Until some fifty years ago, tea plants were raised from tea seeds that were known as seedlings. Each plantation grew its own seed bearers in tea trees, which can grow to a height of about 50 feet (15m). metres). Since then young plants have been raised from cuttings obtained from a mother bush, which is a strong, rich plant specifically selected for propagation. The cuttings are planted in polythene sleeves filled with soil.  Watering and shading the new plants is important, yet it is equally important not to over shade or overwater the cuttings.  Bracken shades are often used to shade the young plants and protect them from the wind, while irrigation trenches are dug to provide water. When the plants are approximately 9 to 12 months* of age, they are ready to be re-planted in the tea fields. Great care is taken to prepare the soil in the areas due to be re-planted to prevent the spread of diseases and to ensure that the soil is as fertile as possible.

Module 1 Lesson

 
  1. Tea Garden
1.1       The Nursery A tea bush can produce tea for up to 70 years but yields tend to reduce after around 50 years. Hence the need to replace older plants, as well as plants which have been affected by disease, with young plants. Until some fifty years ago, tea plants were raised from tea seeds that were known as seedlings. Each plantation grew its own seed bearers in tea trees, which can grow to a height of about 50 feet (15m). metres). Since then young plants have been raised from cuttings obtained from a mother bush, which is a strong, rich plant specifically selected for propagation. The cuttings are planted in polythene sleeves filled with soil.  Watering and shading the new plants is important, yet it is equally important not to over shade or overwater the cuttings.  Bracken shades are often used to shade the young plants and protect them from the wind, while irrigation trenches are dug to provide water. When the plants are approximately 9 to 12 months* of age, they are ready to be re-planted in the tea fields. Great care is taken to prepare the soil in the areas due to be re-planted to prevent the spread of diseases and to ensure that the soil is as fertile as possible. When the plants are approximately 9 to 12 months* of age, they are ready to be re-planted in the tea fields. Great care is taken to prepare the soil in the areas due to be re-planted to prevent the spread of diseases and to ensure that the soil is as fertile as possible.

Module 1 Lesson

 
  1. Tea Garden
1.1       The Nursery A tea bush can produce tea for up to 70 years but yields tend to reduce after around 50 years. Hence the need to replace older plants, as well as plants which have been affected by disease, with young plants. Until some fifty years ago, tea plants were raised from tea seeds that were known as seedlings. Each plantation grew its own seed bearers in tea trees, which can grow to a height of about 50 feet (15m). metres). Since then young plants have been raised from cuttings obtained from a mother bush, which is a strong, rich plant specifically selected for propagation. The cuttings are planted in polythene sleeves filled with soil.  Watering and shading the new plants is important, yet it is equally important not to over shade or overwater the cuttings.  Bracken shades are often used to shade the young plants and protect them from the wind, while irrigation trenches are dug to provide water. When the plants are approximately 9 to 12 months* of age, they are ready to be re-planted in the tea fields. Great care is taken to prepare the soil in the areas due to be re-planted to prevent the spread of diseases and to ensure that the soil is as fertile as possible. When the plants are approximately 9 to 12 months* of age, they are ready to be re-planted in the tea fields. Great care is taken to prepare the soil in the areas due to be re-planted to prevent the spread of diseases and to ensure that the soil is as fertile as possible.

Module 1 Lesson

 
  1. Tea Garden
1.1       The Nursery A tea bush can produce tea for up to 70 years but yields tend to reduce after around 50 years. Hence the need to replace older plants, as well as plants which have been affected by disease, with young plants. Until some fifty years ago, tea plants were raised from tea seeds that were known as seedlings. Each plantation grew its own seed bearers in tea trees, which can grow to a height of about 50 feet (15m). metres). Since then young plants have been raised from cuttings obtained from a mother bush, which is a strong, rich plant specifically selected for propagation. The cuttings are planted in polythene sleeves filled with soil.  Watering and shading the new plants is important, yet it is equally important not to over shade or overwater the cuttings.  Bracken shades are often used to shade the young plants and protect them from the wind, while irrigation trenches are dug to provide water. When the plants are approximately 9 to 12 months* of age, they are ready to be re-planted in the tea fields. Great care is taken to prepare the soil in the areas due to be re-planted to prevent the spread of diseases and to ensure that the soil is as fertile as possible.

Pages: 1 2

Module 1 Lesson

 
  1. Tea Garden
1.1       The Nursery A tea bush can produce tea for up to 70 years but yields tend to reduce after around 50 years. Hence the need to replace older plants, as well as plants which have been affected by disease, with young plants. Until some fifty years ago, tea plants were raised from tea seeds that were known as seedlings. Each plantation grew its own seed bearers in tea trees, which can grow to a height of about 50 feet (15m). metres). Since then young plants have been raised from cuttings obtained from a mother bush, which is a strong, rich plant specifically selected for propagation. The cuttings are planted in polythene sleeves filled with soil.  Watering and shading the new plants is important, yet it is equally important not to over shade or overwater the cuttings.  Bracken shades are often used to shade the young plants and protect them from the wind, while irrigation trenches are dug to provide water. When the plants are approximately 9 to 12 months* of age, they are ready to be re-planted in the tea fields. Great care is taken to prepare the soil in the areas due to be re-planted to prevent the spread of diseases and to ensure that the soil is as fertile as possible. When the plants are approximately 9 to 12 months* of age, they are ready to be re-planted in the tea fields. Great care is taken to prepare the soil in the areas due to be re-planted to prevent the spread of diseases and to ensure that the soil is as fertile as possible.

Module 1 Lesson

 
  1. Tea Garden
1.1       The Nursery A tea bush can produce tea for up to 70 years but yields tend to reduce after around 50 years. Hence the need to replace older plants, as well as plants which have been affected by disease, with young plants. Until some fifty years ago, tea plants were raised from tea seeds that were known as seedlings. Each plantation grew its own seed bearers in tea trees, which can grow to a height of about 50 feet (15m). metres). Since then young plants have been raised from cuttings obtained from a mother bush, which is a strong, rich plant specifically selected for propagation. The cuttings are planted in polythene sleeves filled with soil.  Watering and shading the new plants is important, yet it is equally important not to over shade or overwater the cuttings.  Bracken shades are often used to shade the young plants and protect them from the wind, while irrigation trenches are dug to provide water. When the plants are approximately 9 to 12 months* of age, they are ready to be re-planted in the tea fields. Great care is taken to prepare the soil in the areas due to be re-planted to prevent the spread of diseases and to ensure that the soil is as fertile as possible. When the plants are approximately 9 to 12 months* of age, they are ready to be re-planted in the tea fields. Great care is taken to prepare the soil in the areas due to be re-planted to prevent the spread of diseases and to ensure that the soil is as fertile as possible. <!–nextpage–> as34 When the plants are approximately 9 to 12 months* of age, they are ready to be re-planted in the tea fields. Great care is taken to prepare the soil in the areas due to be re-planted to prevent the spread of diseases and to ensure that the soil is as fertile as possible. When the plants are approximately 9 to 12 months* of age, they are ready to be re-planted in the tea fields. Great care is taken to prepare the soil in the areas due to be re-planted to prevent the spread of diseases and to ensure that the soil is as fertile as possible.

Module 1 Lesson

 
  1. Tea Garden
1.1       The Nursery A tea bush can produce tea for up to 70 years but yields tend to reduce after around 50 years. Hence the need to replace older plants, as well as plants which have been affected by disease, with young plants. Until some fifty years ago, tea plants were raised from tea seeds that were known as seedlings. Each plantation grew its own seed bearers in tea trees, which can grow to a height of about 50 feet (15m). metres). Since then young plants have been raised from cuttings obtained from a mother bush, which is a strong, rich plant specifically selected for propagation. The cuttings are planted in polythene sleeves filled with soil.  Watering and shading the new plants is important, yet it is equally important not to over shade or overwater the cuttings.  Bracken shades are often used to shade the young plants and protect them from the wind, while irrigation trenches are dug to provide water. When the plants are approximately 9 to 12 months* of age, they are ready to be re-planted in the tea fields. Great care is taken to prepare the soil in the areas due to be re-planted to prevent the spread of diseases and to ensure that the soil is as fertile as possible. When the plants are approximately 9 to 12 months* of age, they are ready to be re-planted in the tea fields. Great care is taken to prepare the soil in the areas due to be re-planted to prevent the spread of diseases and to ensure that the soil is as fertile as possible.

Pages: 1 2

Module 1 Lesson

 
  1. Tea Garden
1.1       The Nursery A tea bush can produce tea for up to 70 years but yields tend to reduce after around 50 years. Hence the need to replace older plants, as well as plants which have been affected by disease, with young plants. Until some fifty years ago, tea plants were raised from tea seeds that were known as seedlings. Each plantation grew its own seed bearers in tea trees, which can grow to a height of about 50 feet (15m). metres). Since then young plants have been raised from cuttings obtained from a mother bush, which is a strong, rich plant specifically selected for propagation. The cuttings are planted in polythene sleeves filled with soil.  Watering and shading the new plants is important, yet it is equally important not to over shade or overwater the cuttings.  Bracken shades are often used to shade the young plants and protect them from the wind, while irrigation trenches are dug to provide water.

Pages: 1 2 3

Module 1 Lesson

 
  1. Tea Garden
1.1       The Nursery A tea bush can produce tea for up to 70 years but yields tend to reduce after around 50 years. Hence the need to replace older plants, as well as plants which have been affected by disease, with young plants. Until some fifty years ago, tea plants were raised from tea seeds that were known as seedlings. Each plantation grew its own seed bearers in tea trees, which can grow to a height of about 50 feet (15m). metres). Since then young plants have been raised from cuttings obtained from a mother bush, which is a strong, rich plant specifically selected for propagation. The cuttings are planted in polythene sleeves filled with soil.  Watering and shading the new plants is important, yet it is equally important not to over shade or overwater the cuttings.  Bracken shades are often used to shade the young plants and protect them from the wind, while irrigation trenches are dug to provide water.

Pages: 1 2 3

Module 1 Lesson

 
1. Tea Garden 1.1 The Nursery A tea bush can produce tea for up to 70 years but yields tend to reduce after around 50 years. Hence the need to replace older plants, as well as plants which have been affected by disease, with young plants. Until some fifty years ago, tea plants were raised from tea seeds that were known as seedlings. Each plantation grew its own seed bearers in tea trees, which can grow to a height of about 50 feet (15m). metres). Since then young plants have been raised from cuttings obtained from a mother bush, which is a strong, rich plant specifically selected for propagation. The cuttings are planted in polythene sleeves filled with soil.  Watering and shading the new plants is important, yet it is equally important not to over shade or overwater the cuttings.  Bracken shades are often used to shade the young plants and protect them from the wind, while irrigation trenches are dug to provide water. When the plants are approximately 9 to 12 months* of age, they are ready to be re-planted in the tea fields. Great care is taken to prepare the soil in the areas due to be re-planted to prevent the spread of diseases and to ensure that the soil is as fertile as possibl 1.2 Cultivation The young plants that have been carefully nurtured in nurseries for up to a year are then re-planted in especially prepared fields following the natural contours of the land, or sometimes, on specially prepared terraces to help irrigation and to prevent erosion. The plants are planted 3 to 5 feet (1 to 1.5 metres) apart. The tea plant is adaptable to a wide range of climates and soils provided there is abundant and evenly distributed rainfall (not less than about 85 inches/216cm). Manuring periodically, either with artificial or cattle manure is necessary in order to preserve the bushes in a healthy and vigorous condition. Maintaining soil condition is a vital element to tea propagation. It takes approximately two to three years, depending on the elevation and climatic conditions, before these plants are ready to produce tea. During this period, the plants will undergo a process known as Pruning which helps it to develop in to a fully fledged high-yielding tea bush.

1.2 Cultivation

The young plants that have been carefully nurtured in nurseries for up to a year are then re-planted in especially prepared fields following the natural contours of the land, or sometimes, on specially prepared terraces to help irrigation and to prevent erosion. The plants are planted 3 to 5 feet (1 to 1.5 metres) apart. The tea plant is adaptable to a wide range of climates and soils provided there is abundant and evenly distributed rainfall (not less than about 85 inches/216cm). Manuring periodically, either with artificial or cattle manure is necessary in order to preserve the bushes in a healthy and vigorous condition. Maintaining soil condition is a vital element to tea propagation.

It takes approximately two to three years, depending on the elevation and climatic conditions, before these plants are ready to produce tea. During this period, the plants will undergo a process known as Pruning which helps it to develop in to a fully fledged high-yielding tea bush.

Module 1 Lesson

 

1. Tea Garden

1.1 The Nursery

A tea bush can produce tea for up to 70 years but yields tend to reduce after around 50 years. Hence the need to replace older plants, as well as plants which have been affected by disease, with young plants. Until some fifty years ago, tea plants were raised from tea seeds that were known as seedlings. Each plantation grew its own seed bearers in tea trees, which can grow to a height of about 50 feet (15m). metres). Since then young plants have been raised from cuttings obtained from a mother bush, which is a strong, rich plant specifically selected for propagation. The cuttings are planted in polythene sleeves filled with soil.  Watering and shading the new plants is important, yet it is equally important not to over shade or overwater the cuttings.  Bracken shades are often used to shade the young plants and protect them from the wind, while irrigation trenches are dug to provide water. When the plants are approximately 9 to 12 months* of age, they are ready to be re-planted in the tea fields. Great care is taken to prepare the soil in the areas due to be re-planted to prevent the spread of diseases and to ensure that the soil is as fertile as possible

Pages: 1 2

Module 1 Lesson

 

1. Tea Garden

1.1 The Nursery

A tea bush can produce tea for up to 70 years but yields tend to reduce after around 50 years. Hence the need to replace older plants, as well as plants which have been affected by disease, with young plants.

Until some fifty years ago, tea plants were raised from tea seeds that were known as seedlings. Each plantation grew its own seed bearers in tea trees, which can grow to a height of about 50 feet (15m). metres). Since then young plants have been raised from cuttings obtained from a mother bush, which is a strong, rich plant specifically selected for propagation. The cuttings are planted in polythene sleeves filled with soil.  Watering and shading the new plants is important, yet it is equally important not to over shade or overwater the cuttings.  Bracken shades are often used to shade the young plants and protect them from the wind, while irrigation trenches are dug to provide water.

When the plants are approximately 9 to 12 months* of age, they are ready to be re-planted in the tea fields. Great care is taken to prepare the soil in the areas due to be re-planted to prevent the spread of diseases and to ensure that the soil is as fertile as possible

Pages: 1 2

Module 1 Lesson

 

1. Tea Garden

1.1 The Nursery

A tea bush can produce tea for up to 70 years but yields tend to reduce after around 50 years. Hence the need to replace older plants, as well as plants which have been affected by disease, with young plants.

 

Until some fifty years ago, tea plants were raised from tea seeds that were known as seedlings. Each plantation grew its own seed bearers in tea trees, which can grow to a height of about 50 feet (15m). metres). Since then young plants have been raised from cuttings obtained from a mother bush, which is a strong, rich plant specifically selected for propagation. The cuttings are planted in polythene sleeves filled with soil.  Watering and shading the new plants is important, yet it is equally important not to over shade or overwater the cuttings.  Bracken shades are often used to shade the young plants and protect them from the wind, while irrigation trenches are dug to provide water.

 

When the plants are approximately 9 to 12 months* of age, they are ready to be re-planted in the tea fields. Great care is taken to prepare the soil in the areas due to be re-planted to prevent the spread of diseases and to ensure that the soil is as fertile as possible

 

Pages: 1 2

Module 1 Lesson

 

1. Tea Garden

1.1 The Nursery

A tea bush can produce tea for up to 70 years but yields tend to reduce after around 50 years. Hence the need to replace older plants, as well as plants which have been affected by disease, with young plants.

 

Until some fifty years ago, tea plants were raised from tea seeds that were known as seedlings. Each plantation grew its own seed bearers in tea trees, which can grow to a height of about 50 feet (15m). metres). Since then young plants have been raised from cuttings obtained from a mother bush, which is a strong, rich plant specifically selected for propagation. The cuttings are planted in polythene sleeves filled with soil.  Watering and shading the new plants is important, yet it is equally important not to over shade or overwater the cuttings.  Bracken shades are often used to shade the young plants and protect them from the wind, while irrigation trenches are dug to provide water.

 

When the plants are approximately 9 to 12 months* of age, they are ready to be re-planted in the tea fields. Great care is taken to prepare the soil in the areas due to be re-planted to prevent the spread of diseases and to ensure that the soil is as fertile as possible

 

Pages: 1 2

Module 1 Lesson

 

1. Tea Garden

1.1 The Nursery

A tea bush can produce tea for up to 70 years but yields tend to reduce after around 50 years. Hence the need to replace older plants, as well as plants which have been affected by disease, with young plants.

 

Until some fifty years ago, tea plants were raised from tea seeds that were known as seedlings. Each plantation grew its own seed bearers in tea trees, which can grow to a height of about 50 feet (15m). metres). Since then young plants have been raised from cuttings obtained from a mother bush, which is a strong, rich plant specifically selected for propagation. The cuttings are planted in polythene sleeves filled with soil.  Watering and shading the new plants is important, yet it is equally important not to over shade or overwater the cuttings.  Bracken shades are often used to shade the young plants and protect them from the wind, while irrigation trenches are dug to provide water.

 

When the plants are approximately 9 to 12 months* of age, they are ready to be re-planted in the tea fields. Great care is taken to prepare the soil in the areas due to be re-planted to prevent the spread of diseases and to ensure that the soil is as fertile as possible

 

Pages: 1 2

Module 1 Lesson

 

1. Tea Garden

1.1 The Nursery

A tea bush can produce tea for up to 70 years but yields tend to reduce after around 50 years. Hence the need to replace older plants, as well as plants which have been affected by disease, with young plants.

 

Until some fifty years ago, tea plants were raised from tea seeds that were known as seedlings. Each plantation grew its own seed bearers in tea trees, which can grow to a height of about 50 feet (15m). metres). Since then young plants have been raised from cuttings obtained from a mother bush, which is a strong, rich plant specifically selected for propagation. The cuttings are planted in polythene sleeves filled with soil.  Watering and shading the new plants is important, yet it is equally important not to over shade or overwater the cuttings.  Bracken shades are often used to shade the young plants and protect them from the wind, while irrigation trenches are dug to provide water.

 

When the plants are approximately 9 to 12 months* of age, they are ready to be re-planted in the tea fields. Great care is taken to prepare the soil in the areas due to be re-planted to prevent the spread of diseases and to ensure that the soil is as fertile as possible

 

1.2 Cultivation

The young plants that have been carefully nurtured in nurseries for up to a year are then re-planted in especially prepared fields following the natural contours of the land, or sometimes, on specially prepared terraces to help irrigation and to prevent erosion. The plants are planted 3 to 5 feet (1 to 1.5 metres) apart. The tea plant is adaptable to a wide range of climates and soils provided there is abundant and evenly distributed rainfall (not less than about 85 inches/216cm). Manuring periodically, either with artificial or cattle manure is necessary in order to preserve the bushes in a healthy and vigorous condition. Maintaining soil condition is a vital element to tea propagation.

 

It takes approximately two to three years, depending on the elevation and climatic conditions, before these plants are ready to produce tea. During this period, the plants will undergo a process known as Pruning which helps it to develop in to a fully fledged high-yielding tea bush.

 

1.3 Pruning

When the young plant develops to a height of about half a metre above ground level, it is cut back (i.e. pruned) to within a few inches off the ground to set it on course to develop into a flat-topped bush.

 

Once fully developed, a tea bush is approximately 3 ½ feet (1m) in height, and continues to be pruned in cycles of 1-2 years at low altitude and 3-5 years at higher altitudes. The timing of pruning is also dependent on the rainfall, as it is essential that there is sufficient moisture in the soil.

 

Therefore, the three principle objectives for cyclical pruning of fully developed and yielding tea bushes are:

  1. i. To stimulate shoot growth – The tea bush is pruned to encourage the growth of new shoots or ‘flush’. Regular pruning also prevents flowering and fruit formation. Additionally, pruning creates a wider flat-top bush which in turn increases the number of plucking points per tea bush.
  2. ii. To maintain a healthy frame
  3. iii. To maintain a convenient height for easy harvesting ­– The growth of the tea bush has to be modified in order to create a low, flat, wide bush so as to make it easily accessible for picking.

 

1.4 Plucking

The activity of harvesting fresh young shoots from the mature tea bushes is known as plucking or picking. Each pluck takes only the flush of two tender leaves and bud of tender and succulent fresh growth. Within seven to ten days the bushes grow new shoots and are then re-plucked. This skilled job is traditionally carried out by women who are adept at picking the shoots, breaking them off by twisting the leaves and bud with their fingers and deftly throwing handfuls of shoots into the carrier baskets resting on their backs. Taking two leaf shoots and end bud constitutes fine plucking and this forms good quality tea, while four leaves and the bud forms coarse plucking and yields tea of lower quality.

 

Picking is still done by hand in Sri Lanka in order to preserve the quality of the harvest. The pluckers have a daily target of 20kg and are given a bonus for every kilogram over 20kgs that they pluck. Between two and three thousand leaves are needed to produce just one kilo of unprocessed tea, which is an indication of the enormous quantities of leaf that is plucked each day.

 

Once picked, the fresh leaf is weighed and transported to the tea factory.

 

Pages: 1 2 3

Module 1 Lesson

 

1. Tea Garden

1.1 The Nursery

A tea bush can produce tea for up to 70 years but yields tend to reduce after around 50 years. Hence the need to replace older plants, as well as plants which have been affected by disease, with young plants.

 

Until some fifty years ago, tea plants were raised from tea seeds that were known as seedlings. Each plantation grew its own seed bearers in tea trees, which can grow to a height of about 50 feet (15m). metres). Since then young plants have been raised from cuttings obtained from a mother bush, which is a strong, rich plant specifically selected for propagation. The cuttings are planted in polythene sleeves filled with soil.  Watering and shading the new plants is important, yet it is equally important not to over shade or overwater the cuttings.  Bracken shades are often used to shade the young plants and protect them from the wind, while irrigation trenches are dug to provide water.

 

When the plants are approximately 9 to 12 months* of age, they are ready to be re-planted in the tea fields. Great care is taken to prepare the soil in the areas due to be re-planted to prevent the spread of diseases and to ensure that the soil is as fertile as possible

 

1.2 Cultivation

The young plants that have been carefully nurtured in nurseries for up to a year are then re-planted in especially prepared fields following the natural contours of the land, or sometimes, on specially prepared terraces to help irrigation and to prevent erosion. The plants are planted 3 to 5 feet (1 to 1.5 metres) apart. The tea plant is adaptable to a wide range of climates and soils provided there is abundant and evenly distributed rainfall (not less than about 85 inches/216cm). Manuring periodically, either with artificial or cattle manure is necessary in order to preserve the bushes in a healthy and vigorous condition. Maintaining soil condition is a vital element to tea propagation.

 

It takes approximately two to three years, depending on the elevation and climatic conditions, before these plants are ready to produce tea. During this period, the plants will undergo a process known as Pruning which helps it to develop in to a fully fledged high-yielding tea bush.

 

1.3 Pruning

When the young plant develops to a height of about half a metre above ground level, it is cut back (i.e. pruned) to within a few inches off the ground to set it on course to develop into a flat-topped bush.

 

Once fully developed, a tea bush is approximately 3 ½ feet (1m) in height, and continues to be pruned in cycles of 1-2 years at low altitude and 3-5 years at higher altitudes. The timing of pruning is also dependent on the rainfall, as it is essential that there is sufficient moisture in the soil.

 

Therefore, the three principle objectives for cyclical pruning of fully developed and yielding tea bushes are:

  1. i. To stimulate shoot growth – The tea bush is pruned to encourage the growth of new shoots or ‘flush’. Regular pruning also prevents flowering and fruit formation. Additionally, pruning creates a wider flat-top bush which in turn increases the number of plucking points per tea bush.
  2. ii. To maintain a healthy frame
  3. iii. To maintain a convenient height for easy harvesting ­– The growth of the tea bush has to be modified in order to create a low, flat, wide bush so as to make it easily accessible for picking.

 

1.4 Plucking

The activity of harvesting fresh young shoots from the mature tea bushes is known as plucking or picking. Each pluck takes only the flush of two tender leaves and bud of tender and succulent fresh growth. Within seven to ten days the bushes grow new shoots and are then re-plucked. This skilled job is traditionally carried out by women who are adept at picking the shoots, breaking them off by twisting the leaves and bud with their fingers and deftly throwing handfuls of shoots into the carrier baskets resting on their backs. Taking two leaf shoots and end bud constitutes fine plucking and this forms good quality tea, while four leaves and the bud forms coarse plucking and yields tea of lower quality.

 

Picking is still done by hand in Sri Lanka in order to preserve the quality of the harvest. The pluckers have a daily target of 20kg and are given a bonus for every kilogram over 20kgs that they pluck. Between two and three thousand leaves are needed to produce just one kilo of unprocessed tea, which is an indication of the enormous quantities of leaf that is plucked each day.

 

Once picked, the fresh leaf is weighed and transported to the tea factory.

 

Pages: 1 2 3

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Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 


What you will learn

  • The cultivation and harvesting of tea
  • The manufacture and processing of leaf tea
  • Different Categories of tea


Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1.   Nursery

1.2.   Cultivation

1.3.   Pruning

1.4.   Plucking


2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1.   Withering

2.2.   Rolling

2.3.   Roll-Breaking

2.4.   Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5.   Firing & Baking

2.6.   Sorting & Grading


3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1.   CTC

3.2.   Dust grades – Large leaf grades


4. Categories of Tea

4.1.   White -

4.2.   Green

4.3.   Oolong

4.4.   Black

4.5.   Infusions (Not Tea)

 

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

Tea manufacturing Video

Tea Processing Chart

Leaf tea grade presenter

Evaluation sheet

 

7. Practicals

Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black

Pages: 1 2 3 4

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 



Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 


What you will learn

  • The cultivation and harvesting of tea
  • The manufacture and processing of leaf tea
  • Different Categories of tea


Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1.   Nursery

1.2.   Cultivation

1.3.   Pruning

1.4.   Plucking


2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1.   Withering

2.2.   Rolling

2.3.   Roll-Breaking

2.4.   Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5.   Firing & Baking

2.6.   Sorting & Grading


3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1.   CTC

3.2.   Dust grades – Large leaf grades


4. Categories of Tea

4.1.   White -

4.2.   Green

4.3.   Oolong

4.4.   Black

4.5.   Infusions (Not Tea)

 

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

Tea manufacturing Video
Tea Processing Chart
Leaf tea grade presenter
Evaluation sheet

 

7.0 Practical’s

Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black


1. Tea Garden


1.1 The Nursery

A tea bush can produce tea for up to 70 years but yields tend to reduce after around 50 years. Hence the need to replace older plants, as well as plants which have been affected by disease, with young plants.


Until some fifty years ago, tea plants were raised from tea seeds that were known as seedlings. Each plantation grew its own seed bearers in tea trees, which can grow to a height of about 50 feet (15m). metres).


When the plants are approximately 9 to 12 months* of age, they are ready to be re-planted in the tea fields. Great care is taken to prepare the soil in the areas due to be re-planted to prevent the spread of diseases and to ensure that the soil is as fertile as possible.



1.2 Cultivation

The young plants that have been carefully nurtured in nurseries for up to a year are then re-planted in especially prepared fields following the natural contours of the land, or sometimes, on specially prepared terraces to help irrigation and to prevent erosion. The plants are planted 3 to 5 feet (1 to 1.5 metres) apart.


It takes approximately two to three years, depending on the elevation and climatic conditions, before these plants are ready to produce tea. During this period, the plants will undergo a process known as Pruning which helps it to develop in to a fully fledged high-yielding tea bush.


1.3 Pruning

When the young plant develops to a height of about half a metre above ground level, it is cut back (i.e. pruned) to within a few inches off the ground to set it on course to develop into a flat-topped bush.


Pruning is a much more complicated process than it may appear at first glance, as there are varying pruning styles which can be utilised, depending on the type of tea and the location.


Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 


What you will learn

  • The cultivation and harvesting of tea
  • The manufacture and processing of leaf tea
  • Different Categories of tea


Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1.   Nursery

1.2.   Cultivation

1.3.   Pruning

1.4.   Plucking


2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1.   Withering

2.2.   Rolling

2.3.   Roll-Breaking

2.4.   Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5.   Firing & Baking

2.6.   Sorting & Grading


3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1.   CTC

3.2.   Dust grades – Large leaf grades


4. Categories of Tea

4.1.   White -

4.2.   Green

4.3.   Oolong

4.4.   Black

4.5.   Infusions (Not Tea)

 

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

Tea manufacturing Video
Tea Processing Chart
Leaf tea grade presenter
Evaluation sheet

 

7.0 Practical’s

Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black


1. Tea Garden


1.1 The Nursery

A tea bush can produce tea for up to 70 years but yields tend to reduce after around 50 years. Hence the need to replace older plants, as well as plants which have been affected by disease, with young plants.


Until some fifty years ago, tea plants were raised from tea seeds that were known as seedlings. Each plantation grew its own seed bearers in tea trees, which can grow to a height of about 50 feet (15m). metres).


When the plants are approximately 9 to 12 months* of age, they are ready to be re-planted in the tea fields. Great care is taken to prepare the soil in the areas due to be re-planted to prevent the spread of diseases and to ensure that the soil is as fertile as possible.



1.2 Cultivation

The young plants that have been carefully nurtured in nurseries for up to a year are then re-planted in especially prepared fields following the natural contours of the land, or sometimes, on specially prepared terraces to help irrigation and to prevent erosion. The plants are planted 3 to 5 feet (1 to 1.5 metres) apart.


It takes approximately two to three years, depending on the elevation and climatic conditions, before these plants are ready to produce tea. During this period, the plants will undergo a process known as Pruning which helps it to develop in to a fully fledged high-yielding tea bush.


1.3 Pruning

When the young plant develops to a height of about half a metre above ground level, it is cut back (i.e. pruned) to within a few inches off the ground to set it on course to develop into a flat-topped bush.


Pruning is a much more complicated process than it may appear at first glance, as there are varying pruning styles which can be utilised, depending on the type of tea and the location.


1.4 Plucking

The activity of harvesting fresh young shoots from the mature tea bushes is known as plucking or picking. Each pluck takes only the flush of two tender leaves and bud of tender and succulent fresh growth. Within seven to ten days the bushes grow new shoots and are then re-plucked. This skilled job is traditionally carried out by women who are adept at picking the shoots, breaking them off by twisting the leaves and bud with their fingers and deftly throwing handfuls of shoots into the carrier baskets resting on their backs. Taking two leaf shoots and end bud constitutes fine plucking and this forms good quality tea, while four leaves and the bud forms coarse plucking and yields tea of lower quality.


Picking is still done by hand in Sri Lanka in order to preserve the quality of the harvest. The pluckers have a daily target of 20kg and are given a bonus for every kilogram over 20kgs that they pluck.  Between two and three thousand leaves are needed to produce just one kilo of unprocessed tea, which is an indication of the enormous quantities of leaf that is plucked each day.


Once picked, the fresh leaf is weighed and transported to the tea factory.



Module 3 study material

 
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Module 3

 

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SOT March 2013

 
Peliyagoda-Visit to Dilmah
Moratuwa- March 2013
Class Room Sessions
Estate-visits
Real-high-tea-at-grand-hotel
 

SOT November 2012

Dilmah School of Tea (Nov-12)-Sessions
Visits to Estate ( November 2012)
SOT @GrandHotel
Dilmah School of Tea (Nov-12)- Tea Gastromony Dinner
Dilmah School of Tea (Nov-12)-Visit to Dilmah

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Dilmah School of Tea Videos

 

School of Tea, Intermediate Certificate Course –November 2012

 

School of Tea – May 2012

Tea Mixology Tea-The New Wine Basics-Cooking With Tea
Tea & Cheese Pairing

 

School of Tea-2010

 

 Day 1 – 31st July

 

Welcome address Its not size that really matters CTC
Different categories of tea Seasonal Flush From Cognac and Wine to Tea
Celebration of terrior in tea Tasting different types of tea Not quite white
Balancing the Flavours The importance of freshness Group quiz
One tea two personalities Make your own tea Explanation of The

 

Day 2 – 1st August

 

Delighting the Consumer in Tea Tea & Gastronomy Suggested matching of food with tea
Matching teas and cheese Tea Culinary Tea with Chocolates
How to present an award winning
afternoon tea
Tea Mixlong new Tea Mixlong new
Tea Mixology 2 Make your own Concoction Presentation of Certificates

 

Dilmah School of Tea Videos

 

School of Tea, Intermediate Certificate Course –November 2012

 

School of Tea – May 2012

Tea Mixology Tea-The New Wine Basics-Cooking With Tea
Tea & Cheese Pairing

 

School of Tea-2010

 

 Day 1 – 31st July

 

Welcome address Its not size that really matters CTC
Different categories of tea Seasonal Flush From Cognac and Wine to Tea
Celebration of terrior in tea Tasting different types of tea Not quite white
Balancing the Flavours The importance of freshness Group quiz
One tea two personalities Make your own tea Explanation of The

 

Day 2 – 1st August

 

Delighting the Consumer in Tea Tea & Gastronomy Suggested matching of food with tea
Matching teas and cheese Tea Culinary Tea with Chocolates
How to present an award winningafternoon tea Tea Mixlong new Tea Mixlong new
Tea Mixology 2 Make your own Concoction Presentation of Certificates

 

Dilmah School of Tea Videos

 
school of Tea – May 2012   Click on a thumbnail to watch the video. Please note that you need to be logged-in to view all the videos or you will only be able to watch the ‘Welcome address’.   Day 1 – 31st July
Welcome address Its not size that really matters CTC
Different categories of tea Seasonal Flush From Cognac and Wine to Tea
Celebration of terrior in tea Tasting different types of tea Not quite white
Balancing the Flavours The importance of freshness Group quiz
One tea two personalities Make your own tea Explanation of The
  Day 2 – 1st August
Delighting the Consumer in Tea Tea & Gastronomy Suggested matching of food with tea
Matching teas and cheese Tea Culinary Tea with Chocolates
How to present an award winning afternoon tea Tea Mixlong new Tea Mixlong new
Tea Mixology 2 Make your own Concoction Presentation of Certificates

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The first school of tea

 

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Why School of Tea?

 

There is a story behind your cup of tea that is almost magical.


The natural herb discovered 5,000 years ago has inspired Emperors and Poets, Commoners and Kings whilst offering comfort, invigoration, nourishment, inspiration and solace. More recently scientific research has emphasized the protective and healing properties in tea. This fusion of sensorial and functional benefits, makes tea in every sense, a gift of nature.


After water, tea is the most popular beverage in the world. Appreciated equally for the pleasure it offers, for its health benefits and as a pure and natural drink, fine tea requires care in its preparation and presentation, to bring out it true personality. The Dilmah School of Tea has the objective of sharing the story of tea to enhance the appreciation of real tea. Knowledge of tea, how it is grown, hand picked and traditionally produced, the expertise that goes into its manufacture, the influence of climate and the art of the tea maker only magnify the pleasure in your cup of tea.


The School of Tea was conceived and designed by a family of Teamen, whose appreciation of tea is founded on a lifelong commitment to tea; that is the passion of Dilmah Founder Merrill J. Fernando, who devoted his life to tea. That commitment brings with it a unique and undiluted perspective on tea.


The School therefore aims also to inculcate respect for this ancient and delicious herb through a deeper understanding of its nature. Ultimately the knowledge that we would like to present at the Dilmah School of Tea is intended to share with tea aficionados around the world, the joys, the ethics and the healthfulness in tea. That means greater enjoyment of the richness, variety, flavour and antioxidants in tea in the home, in restaurants, cafes and hotels, serving fine, fresh tea with elegance and style, without compromising its taste, flavour or natural goodness.


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Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 
Duration: 30 minutes What you will learn • The cultivation and harvesting of tea • The manufacture and processing of leaf tea • Different Categories of tea Module Overview 1. Tea gardens (PP) 1.1. Nursery 1.2. Cultivation 1.3. Pruning 1.4. Plucking 2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP) 2.1. Withering 2.2. Rolling 2.3. Roll-Breaking 2.4. Fermentation/Oxidization 2.5. Firing & Baking 2.6. Sorting & Grading 3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop) 3.1. CTC 3.2. Dust grades – Large leaf grades 4. Categories of Tea 4.1. White – 4.2. Green 4.3. Oolong 4.4. Black 4.5. Infusions (Not Tea) 6. Summary of Videos, Presentations • Tea manufacturing Video • Tea Processing Chart • Leaf tea grade presenter • Evaluation sheet 7.0 Practical’s • Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 
Duration: 30 minutes What you will learn • The cultivation and harvesting of tea • The manufacture and processing of leaf tea • Different Categories of tea Module Overview 1. Tea gardens (PP) 1.1. Nursery 1.2. Cultivation 1.3. Pruning 1.4. Plucking 2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP) 2.1. Withering 2.2. Rolling 2.3. Roll-Breaking 2.4. Fermentation/Oxidization 2.5. Firing & Baking 2.6. Sorting & Grading 3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop) 3.1. CTC 3.2. Dust grades – Large leaf grades 4. Categories of Tea 4.1. White – 4.2. Green 4.3. Oolong 4.4. Black 4.5. Infusions (Not Tea) 6. Summary of Videos, Presentations • Tea manufacturing Video • Tea Processing Chart • Leaf tea grade presenter • Evaluation sheet 7.0 Practical’s • Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black

Pages: 1 2

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 


What you will learn

  • The cultivation and harvesting of tea
  • The manufacture and processing of leaf tea
  • Different Categories of tea


Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1.   Nursery

1.2.   Cultivation

1.3.   Pruning

1.4.   Plucking


2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1.   Withering

2.2.   Rolling

2.3.   Roll-Breaking

2.4.   Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5.   Firing & Baking

2.6.   Sorting & Grading


3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1.   CTC

3.2.   Dust grades – Large leaf grades


4. Categories of Tea

4.1.   White -

4.2.   Green

4.3.   Oolong

4.4.   Black

4.5.   Infusions (Not Tea)

 

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

Tea manufacturing Video
Tea Processing Chart
Leaf tea grade presenter
Evaluation sheet

 

7.0 Practical’s

Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black

Pages: 1 2 3 4

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 



Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 


What you will learn

  • The cultivation and harvesting of tea
  • The manufacture and processing of leaf tea
  • Different Categories of tea


Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1.   Nursery

1.2.   Cultivation

1.3.   Pruning

1.4.   Plucking


2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1.   Withering

2.2.   Rolling

2.3.   Roll-Breaking

2.4.   Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5.   Firing & Baking

2.6.   Sorting & Grading


3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1.   CTC

3.2.   Dust grades – Large leaf grades


4. Categories of Tea

4.1.   White -

4.2.   Green

4.3.   Oolong

4.4.   Black

4.5.   Infusions (Not Tea)

 

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

Tea manufacturing Video
Tea Processing Chart
Leaf tea grade presenter
Evaluation sheet

 

7.0 Practical’s

Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black


1. Tea Garden


1.1 The Nursery

A tea bush can produce tea for up to 70 years but yields tend to reduce after around 50 years. Hence the need to replace older plants, as well as plants which have been affected by disease, with young plants.


Until some fifty years ago, tea plants were raised from tea seeds that were known as seedlings. Each plantation grew its own seed bearers in tea trees, which can grow to a height of about 50 feet (15m). metres).


When the plants are approximately 9 to 12 months* of age, they are ready to be re-planted in the tea fields. Great care is taken to prepare the soil in the areas due to be re-planted to prevent the spread of diseases and to ensure that the soil is as fertile as possible.


Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes

What you will learn • The cultivation and harvesting of tea • The manufacture and processing of leaf tea • Different Categories of tea

Module Overview 1. Tea gardens (PP) 1.1. Nursery 1.2. Cultivation 1.3. Pruning 1.4. Plucking

2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP) 2.1. Withering 2.2. Rolling 2.3. Roll-Breaking 2.4. Fermentation/Oxidization 2.5. Firing & Baking 2.6. Sorting & Grading

3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop) 3.1. CTC 3.2. Dust grades – Large leaf grades

4. Categories of Tea 4.1. White - 4.2. Green 4.3. Oolong 4.4. Black 4.5. Infusions (Not Tea)

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations • Tea manufacturing Video • Tea Processing Chart • Leaf tea grade presenter • Evaluation sheet

7.0 Practical’s • Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black

Pages: 1 2

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes

What you will learn

• The cultivation and harvesting of tea

• The manufacture and processing of leaf tea

• Different Categories of tea

Module Overview 1. Tea gardens (PP) 1.1. Nursery 1.2. Cultivation 1.3. Pruning 1.4. Plucking

2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP) 2.1. Withering 2.2. Rolling 2.3. Roll-Breaking 2.4. Fermentation/Oxidization 2.5. Firing & Baking 2.6. Sorting & Grading

3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop) 3.1. CTC 3.2. Dust grades – Large leaf grades

4. Categories of Tea 4.1. White - 4.2. Green 4.3. Oolong 4.4. Black 4.5. Infusions (Not Tea)

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations • Tea manufacturing Video • Tea Processing Chart • Leaf tea grade presenter • Evaluation sheet

7.0 Practical’s • Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black

Pages: 1 2

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes

What you will learn

• The cultivation and harvesting of tea

• The manufacture and processing of leaf tea

• Different Categories of tea

Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1. Nursery

1.2. Cultivation

1.3. Pruning

1.4. Plucking

2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1. Withering

2.2. Rolling

2.3. Roll-Breaking

2.4. Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5. Firing & Baking

2.6. Sorting & Grading

3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop) 3.1. CTC 3.2. Dust grades – Large leaf grades

4. Categories of Tea 4.1. White - 4.2. Green 4.3. Oolong 4.4. Black 4.5. Infusions (Not Tea)

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations • Tea manufacturing Video • Tea Processing Chart • Leaf tea grade presenter • Evaluation sheet

7.0 Practical’s • Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black

Pages: 1 2

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes

What you will learn

• The cultivation and harvesting of tea

• The manufacture and processing of leaf tea

• Different Categories of tea

Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1. Nursery

1.2. Cultivation

1.3. Pruning

1.4. Plucking

2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1. Withering

2.2. Rolling

2.3. Roll-Breaking

2.4. Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5. Firing & Baking

2.6. Sorting & Grading

3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1. CTC

3.2. Dust grades – Large leaf grades

4. Categories of Tea

4.1. White -

4.2. Green

4.3. Oolong

4.4. Black

4.5. Infusions (Not Tea)

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

• Tea manufacturing Video

• Tea Processing Chart

• Leaf tea grade presenter

• Evaluation sheet

7.0 Practical’s

• Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black

Pages: 1 2

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes

 

What you will learn

• The cultivation and harvesting of tea

• The manufacture and processing of leaf tea

• Different Categories of tea

 

Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1. Nursery

1.2. Cultivation

1.3. Pruning

1.4. Plucking

2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1. Withering

2.2. Rolling

2.3. Roll-Breaking

2.4. Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5. Firing & Baking

2.6. Sorting & Grading

3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1. CTC

3.2. Dust grades – Large leaf grades

4. Categories of Tea

4.1. White -

4.2. Green

4.3. Oolong

4.4. Black

4.5. Infusions (Not Tea)

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

• Tea manufacturing Video

• Tea Processing Chart

• Leaf tea grade presenter

• Evaluation sheet

7.0 Practical’s

• Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black

Pages: 1 2

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes

What you will learn

• The cultivation and harvesting of tea

• The manufacture and processing of leaf tea

• Different Categories of tea

Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1. Nursery

1.2. Cultivation

1.3. Pruning

1.4. Plucking

2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1. Withering

2.2. Rolling

2.3. Roll-Breaking

2.4. Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5. Firing & Baking

2.6. Sorting & Grading

3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1. CTC

3.2. Dust grades – Large leaf grades

4. Categories of Tea

4.1. White -

4.2. Green

4.3. Oolong

4.4. Black

4.5. Infusions (Not Tea)

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

• Tea manufacturing Video

• Tea Processing Chart

• Leaf tea grade presenter

• Evaluation sheet

7.0 Practical’s

• Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black

Pages: 1 2

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes

What you will learn

• The cultivation and harvesting of tea

• The manufacture and processing of leaf tea

• Different Categories of tea

Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1. Nursery

1.2. Cultivation

1.3. Pruning

1.4. Plucking

2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1. Withering

2.2. Rolling

2.3. Roll-Breaking

2.4. Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5. Firing & Baking

2.6. Sorting & Grading

3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1. CTC

3.2. Dust grades – Large leaf grades

4. Categories of Tea

4.1. White -

4.2. Green

4.3. Oolong

4.4. Black

4.5. Infusions (Not Tea)

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

• Tea manufacturing Video

• Tea Processing Chart

• Leaf tea grade presenter

• Evaluation sheet

7.0 Practical’s

• Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes

What you will learn

• The cultivation and harvesting of tea

• The manufacture and processing of leaf tea

• Different Categories of tea

Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1. Nursery

1.2. Cultivation

1.3. Pruning

1.4. Plucking

2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1. Withering

2.2. Rolling

2.3. Roll-Breaking

2.4. Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5. Firing & Baking

2.6. Sorting & Grading

3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1. CTC

3.2. Dust grades – Large leaf grades

4. Categories of Tea

4.1. White -

4.2. Green

4.3. Oolong

4.4. Black

4.5. Infusions (Not Tea)

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

• Tea manufacturing Video

• Tea Processing Chart

• Leaf tea grade presenter

• Evaluation sheet

7.0 Practical’s

• Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black

Pages: 1 2

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes

What you will learn

• The cultivation and harvesting of tea

• The manufacture and processing of leaf tea

• Different Categories of tea

Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1. Nursery

1.2. Cultivation

1.3. Pruning

1.4. Plucking

2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1. Withering

2.2. Rolling

2.3. Roll-Breaking

2.4. Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5. Firing & Baking

2.6. Sorting & Grading

3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1. CTC

3.2. Dust grades – Large leaf grades

4. Categories of Tea

4.1. White -

4.2. Green

4.3. Oolong

4.4. Black

4.5. Infusions (Not Tea)

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

• Tea manufacturing Video

• Tea Processing Chart

• Leaf tea grade presenter

• Evaluation sheet

7.0 Practical’s

• Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black

Pages: 1 2

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes

What you will learn

• The cultivation and harvesting of tea

• The manufacture and processing of leaf tea

• Different Categories of tea

Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1. Nursery

1.2. Cultivation

1.3. Pruning

1.4. Plucking

2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1. Withering

2.2. Rolling

2.3. Roll-Breaking

2.4. Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5. Firing & Baking

2.6. Sorting & Grading

3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1. CTC

3.2. Dust grades – Large leaf grades

4. Categories of Tea

4.1. White -

4.2. Green

4.3. Oolong

4.4. Black

4.5. Infusions (Not Tea)

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

• Tea manufacturing Video

• Tea Processing Chart

• Leaf tea grade presenter

• Evaluation sheet

7.0 Practical’s

• Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black

Pages: 1 2

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes

What you will learn

• The cultivation and harvesting of tea

• The manufacture and processing of leaf tea

• Different Categories of tea

 

Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1. Nursery

1.2. Cultivation

1.3. Pruning

1.4. Plucking

2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1. Withering

2.2. Rolling

2.3. Roll-Breaking

2.4. Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5. Firing & Baking

2.6. Sorting & Grading

3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1. CTC

3.2. Dust grades – Large leaf grades

4. Categories of Tea

4.1. White -

4.2. Green

4.3. Oolong

4.4. Black

4.5. Infusions (Not Tea)

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

• Tea manufacturing Video

• Tea Processing Chart

• Leaf tea grade presenter

• Evaluation sheet

7.0 Practical’s

• Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black

Pages: 1 2

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes

What you will learn

• The cultivation and harvesting of tea

• The manufacture and processing of leaf tea

• Different Categories of tea

Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1. Nursery

1.2. Cultivation

1.3. Pruning

1.4. Plucking

2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1. Withering

2.2. Rolling

2.3. Roll-Breaking

2.4. Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5. Firing & Baking

2.6. Sorting & Grading

3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1. CTC

3.2. Dust grades – Large leaf grades

4. Categories of Tea

4.1. White -

4.2. Green

4.3. Oolong

4.4. Black

4.5. Infusions (Not Tea)

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

• Tea manufacturing Video

• Tea Processing Chart

• Leaf tea grade presenter

• Evaluation sheet

7.0 Practical’s

• Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes

 

What you will learn

• The cultivation and harvesting of tea

• The manufacture and processing of leaf tea

• Different Categories of tea

 

Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1. Nursery

1.2. Cultivation

1.3. Pruning

1.4. Plucking

2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1. Withering

2.2. Rolling

2.3. Roll-Breaking

2.4. Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5. Firing & Baking

2.6. Sorting & Grading

3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1. CTC

3.2. Dust grades – Large leaf grades

4. Categories of Tea

4.1. White -

4.2. Green

4.3. Oolong

4.4. Black

4.5. Infusions (Not Tea)

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

• Tea manufacturing Video

• Tea Processing Chart

• Leaf tea grade presenter

• Evaluation sheet

7.0 Practical’s

• Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes


What you will learn

  • The cultivation and harvesting of tea

  • The manufacture and processing of leaf tea

  • Different Categories of tea


Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1.   Nursery

1.2.   Cultivation

1.3.   Pruning

1.4.   Plucking

2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1.   Withering

2.2.   Rolling

2.3.   Roll-Breaking

2.4.   Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5.   Firing & Baking

2.6.   Sorting & Grading

3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1.   CTC

3.2.   Dust grades – Large leaf grades

4. Categories of Tea

4.1.   White -

4.2.   Green

4.3.   Oolong

4.4.   Black

4.5.   Infusions (Not Tea)

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

  • Tea manufacturing Video

  • Tea Processing Chart

  • Leaf tea grade presenter

  • Evaluation sheet

7.0 Practical’s

  • Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black


Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes

What you will learn

• The cultivation and harvesting of tea

• The manufacture and processing of leaf tea

• Different Categories of tea

Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1. Nursery

1.2. Cultivation

1.3. Pruning

1.4. Plucking

2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1. Withering

2.2. Rolling

2.3. Roll-Breaking

2.4. Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5. Firing & Baking

2.6. Sorting & Grading

3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1. CTC

3.2. Dust grades – Large leaf grades

4. Categories of Tea

4.1. White -

4.2. Green

4.3. Oolong

4.4. Black

4.5. Infusions (Not Tea)

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

• Tea manufacturing Video

• Tea Processing Chart

• Leaf tea grade presenter

• Evaluation sheet

7.0 Practical’s

• Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black

1. Tea Garden

1.1 The Nursery

A tea bush can produce tea for up to 70 years but yields tend to reduce after around 50 years. Hence the need to replace older plants, as well as plants which have been affected by disease, with young plants.

Until some fifty years ago, tea plants were raised from tea seeds that were known as seedlings. Each plantation grew its own seed bearers in tea trees, which can grow to a height of about 50 feet (15m). metres).

When the plants are approximately 9 to 12 months* of age, they are ready to be re-planted in the tea fields. Great care is taken to prepare the soil in the areas due to be re-planted to prevent the spread of diseases and to ensure that the soil is as fertile as possible.

1.2 Cultivation

The young plants that have been carefully nurtured in nurseries for up to a year are then re-planted in especially prepared fields following the natural contours of the land, or sometimes, on specially prepared terraces to help irrigation and to prevent erosion. The plants are planted 3 to 5 feet (1 to 1.5 metres) apart.

It takes approximately two to three years, depending on the elevation and climatic conditions, before these plants are ready to produce tea. During this period, the plants will undergo a process known as Pruning which helps it to develop in to a fully fledged high-yielding tea bush.

1.3 Pruning

When the young plant develops to a height of about half a metre above ground level, it is cut back (i.e. pruned) to within a few inches off the ground to set it on course to develop into a flat-topped bush.

Pruning is a much more complicated process than it may appear at first glance, as there are varying pruning styles which can be utilised, depending on the type of tea and the location.

1.4 Plucking

The activity of harvesting fresh young shoots from the mature tea bushes is known as plucking or picking. Each pluck takes only the flush of two tender leaves and bud of tender and succulent fresh growth. Within seven to ten days the bushes grow new shoots and are then re-plucked. This skilled job is traditionally carried out by women who are adept at picking the shoots, breaking them off by twisting the leaves and bud with their fingers and deftly throwing handfuls of shoots into the carrier baskets resting on their backs. Taking two leaf shoots and end bud constitutes fine plucking and this forms good quality tea, while four leaves and the bud forms coarse plucking and yields tea of lower quality.

Picking is still done by hand in Sri Lanka in order to preserve the quality of the harvest. The pluckers have a daily target of 20kg and are given a bonus for every kilogram over 20kgs that they pluck. Between two and three thousand leaves are needed to produce just one kilo of unprocessed tea, which is an indication of the enormous quantities of leaf that is plucked each day.

Once picked, the fresh leaf is weighed and transported to the tea factory.

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes

What you will learn

• The cultivation and harvesting of tea

• The manufacture and processing of leaf tea

• Different Categories of tea

Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1. Nursery

1.2. Cultivation

1.3. Pruning

1.4. Plucking

2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1. Withering

2.2. Rolling

2.3. Roll-Breaking

2.4. Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5. Firing & Baking

2.6. Sorting & Grading

3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1. CTC

3.2. Dust grades – Large leaf grades

4. Categories of Tea

4.1. White -

4.2. Green

4.3. Oolong

4.4. Black

4.5. Infusions (Not Tea)

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

• Tea manufacturing Video

• Tea Processing Chart

• Leaf tea grade presenter

• Evaluation sheet

7.0 Practical’s

• Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black

  1. 1. Tea Garden
1.1       The Nursery A tea bush can produce tea for up to 70 years but yields tend to reduce after around 50 years. Hence the need to replace older plants, as well as plants which have been affected by disease, with young plants. Until some fifty years ago, tea plants were raised from tea seeds that were known as seedlings. Each plantation grew its own seed bearers in tea trees, which can grow to a height of about 50 feet (15m). metres). When the plants are approximately 9 to 12 months* of age, they are ready to be re-planted in the tea fields. Great care is taken to prepare the soil in the areas due to be re-planted to prevent the spread of diseases and to ensure that the soil is as fertile as possible. 1.2       Cultivation The young plants that have been carefully nurtured in nurseries for up to a year are then re-planted in especially prepared fields following the natural contours of the land, or sometimes, on specially prepared terraces to help irrigation and to prevent erosion. The plants are planted 3 to 5 feet (1 to 1.5 metres) apart. It takes approximately two to three years, depending on the elevation and climatic conditions, before these plants are ready to produce tea. During this period, the plants will undergo a process known as Pruning which helps it to develop in to a fully fledged high-yielding tea bush. 1.3       Pruning When the young plant develops to a height of about half a metre above ground level, it is cut back (i.e. pruned) to within a few inches off the ground to set it on course to develop into a flat-topped bush. Pruning is a much more complicated process than it may appear at first glance, as there are varying pruning styles which can be utilised, depending on the type of tea and the location. 1.4       Plucking The activity of harvesting fresh young shoots from the mature tea bushes is known as plucking or picking. Each pluck takes only the flush of two tender leaves and bud of tender and succulent fresh growth. Within seven to ten days the bushes grow new shoots and are then re-plucked. This skilled job is traditionally carried out by women who are adept at picking the shoots, breaking them off by twisting the leaves and bud with their fingers and deftly throwing handfuls of shoots into the carrier baskets resting on their backs. Taking two leaf shoots and end bud constitutes fine plucking and this forms good quality tea, while four leaves and the bud forms coarse plucking and yields tea of lower quality. Picking is still done by hand in Sri Lanka in order to preserve the quality of the harvest. The pluckers have a daily target of 20kg and are given a bonus for every kilogram over 20kgs that they pluck.  Between two and three thousand leaves are needed to produce just one kilo of unprocessed tea, which is an indication of the enormous quantities of leaf that is plucked each day. Once picked, the fresh leaf is weighed and transported to the tea factory.

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes

What you will learn

• The cultivation and harvesting of tea

• The manufacture and processing of leaf tea

• Different Categories of tea

Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1. Nursery

1.2. Cultivation

1.3. Pruning

1.4. Plucking

2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1. Withering

2.2. Rolling

2.3. Roll-Breaking

2.4. Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5. Firing & Baking

2.6. Sorting & Grading

3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1. CTC

3.2. Dust grades – Large leaf grades

4. Categories of Tea

4.1. White -

4.2. Green

4.3. Oolong

4.4. Black

4.5. Infusions (Not Tea)

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

• Tea manufacturing Video

• Tea Processing Chart

• Leaf tea grade presenter

• Evaluation sheet

7.0 Practical’s

• Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black

1. Tea Garden


1.1 The Nursery

A tea bush can produce tea for up to 70 years but yields tend to reduce after around 50 years. Hence the need to replace older plants, as well as plants which have been affected by disease, with young plants.


Until some fifty years ago, tea plants were raised from tea seeds that were known as seedlings. Each plantation grew its own seed bearers in tea trees, which can grow to a height of about 50 feet (15m). metres).


When the plants are approximately 9 to 12 months* of age, they are ready to be re-planted in the tea fields. Great care is taken to prepare the soil in the areas due to be re-planted to prevent the spread of diseases and to ensure that the soil is as fertile as possible.



1.2 Cultivation


The young plants that have been carefully nurtured in nurseries for up to a year are then re-planted in especially prepared fields following the natural contours of the land, or sometimes, on specially prepared terraces to help irrigation and to prevent erosion. The plants are planted 3 to 5 feet (1 to 1.5 metres) apart.


It takes approximately two to three years, depending on the elevation and climatic conditions, before these plants are ready to produce tea. During this period, the plants will undergo a process known as Pruning which helps it to develop in to a fully fledged high-yielding tea bush.



1.3 Pruning


When the young plant develops to a height of about half a metre above ground level, it is cut back (i.e. pruned) to within a few inches off the ground to set it on course to develop into a flat-topped bush.


Pruning is a much more complicated process than it may appear at first glance, as there are varying pruning styles which can be utilised, depending on the type of tea and the location.



1.4 Plucking


The activity of harvesting fresh young shoots from the mature tea bushes is known as plucking or picking. Each pluck takes only the flush of two tender leaves and bud of tender and succulent fresh growth. Within seven to ten days the bushes grow new shoots and are then re-plucked. This skilled job is traditionally carried out by women who are adept at picking the shoots, breaking them off by twisting the leaves and bud with their fingers and deftly throwing handfuls of shoots into the carrier baskets resting on their backs. Taking two leaf shoots and end bud constitutes fine plucking and this forms good quality tea, while four leaves and the bud forms coarse plucking and yields tea of lower quality.


Picking is still done by hand in Sri Lanka in order to preserve the quality of the harvest. The pluckers have a daily target of 20kg and are given a bonus for every kilogram over 20kgs that they pluck. Between two and three thousand leaves are needed to produce just one kilo of unprocessed tea, which is an indication of the enormous quantities of leaf that is plucked each day.


Once picked, the fresh leaf is weighed and transported to the tea factory.

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes

What you will learn

• The cultivation and harvesting of tea

• The manufacture and processing of leaf tea

• Different Categories of tea

Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1. Nursery

1.2. Cultivation

1.3. Pruning

1.4. Plucking

2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1. Withering

2.2. Rolling

2.3. Roll-Breaking

2.4. Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5. Firing & Baking

2.6. Sorting & Grading

3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1. CTC

3.2. Dust grades – Large leaf grades

4. Categories of Tea

4.1. White -

4.2. Green

4.3. Oolong

4.4. Black

4.5. Infusions (Not Tea)

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

• Tea manufacturing Video

• Tea Processing Chart

• Leaf tea grade presenter

• Evaluation sheet

7.0 Practical’s

• Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black

Pages: 1 2

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes

What you will learn

• The cultivation and harvesting of tea

• The manufacture and processing of leaf tea

• Different Categories of tea

Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1. Nursery

1.2. Cultivation

1.3. Pruning

1.4. Plucking

2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1. Withering

2.2. Rolling

2.3. Roll-Breaking

2.4. Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5. Firing & Baking

2.6. Sorting & Grading

3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1. CTC

3.2. Dust grades – Large leaf grades

4. Categories of Tea

4.1. White -

4.2. Green

4.3. Oolong

4.4. Black

4.5. Infusions (Not Tea)

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

• Tea manufacturing Video

• Tea Processing Chart

• Leaf tea grade presenter

• Evaluation sheet

7.0 Practical’s

• Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black

Pages: 1 2

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes

What you will learn

• The cultivation and harvesting of tea

• The manufacture and processing of leaf tea

• Different Categories of tea

Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1. Nursery

1.2. Cultivation

1.3. Pruning

1.4. Plucking

2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1. Withering

2.2. Rolling

2.3. Roll-Breaking

2.4. Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5. Firing & Baking

2.6. Sorting & Grading

3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1. CTC

3.2. Dust grades – Large leaf grades

4. Categories of Tea

4.1. White -

4.2. Green

4.3. Oolong

4.4. Black

4.5. Infusions (Not Tea)

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

• Tea manufacturing Video

• Tea Processing Chart

• Leaf tea grade presenter

• Evaluation sheet

7.0 Practical’s

• Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black

Pages: 1 2

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes


What you will learn

  • The cultivation and harvesting of tea

  • The manufacture and processing of leaf tea

  • Different Categories of tea


Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1.   Nursery

1.2.   Cultivation

1.3.   Pruning

1.4.   Plucking

  1. 2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1.   Withering

2.2.   Rolling

2.3.   Roll-Breaking

2.4.   Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5.   Firing & Baking

2.6.   Sorting & Grading

  1. 3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1.   CTC

3.2.   Dust grades – Large leaf grades

  1. 4. Categories of Tea

4.1.   White -

4.2.   Green

4.3.   Oolong

4.4.   Black

4.5.   Infusions (Not Tea)

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

  • Tea manufacturing Video

  • Tea Processing Chart

  • Leaf tea grade presenter

  • Evaluation sheet

7.0 Practical’s

  • Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes

What you will learn

• The cultivation and harvesting of tea

• The manufacture and processing of leaf tea

• Different Categories of tea

Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1. Nursery

1.2. Cultivation

1.3. Pruning

1.4. Plucking

2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1. Withering

2.2. Rolling

2.3. Roll-Breaking

2.4. Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5. Firing & Baking

2.6. Sorting & Grading

3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1. CTC

3.2. Dust grades – Large leaf grades

4. Categories of Tea

4.1. White -

4.2. Green

4.3. Oolong

4.4. Black

4.5. Infusions (Not Tea)

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

• Tea manufacturing Video

• Tea Processing Chart

• Leaf tea grade presenter

• Evaluation sheet

7.0 Practical’s

• Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black

Pages: 1 2 3

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes

What you will learn

• The cultivation and harvesting of tea

• The manufacture and processing of leaf tea

• Different Categories of tea

Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1. Nursery

1.2. Cultivation

1.3. Pruning

1.4. Plucking

2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1. Withering

2.2. Rolling

2.3. Roll-Breaking

2.4. Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5. Firing & Baking

2.6. Sorting & Grading

3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1. CTC

3.2. Dust grades – Large leaf grades

4. Categories of Tea

4.1. White -

4.2. Green

4.3. Oolong

4.4. Black

4.5. Infusions (Not Tea)

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

• Tea manufacturing Video

• Tea Processing Chart

• Leaf tea grade presenter

• Evaluation sheet

7.0 Practical’s

• Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black

Pages: 1 2 3

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes

What you will learn

• The cultivation and harvesting of tea

• The manufacture and processing of leaf tea

• Different Categories of tea

Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1. Nursery

1.2. Cultivation

1.3. Pruning

1.4. Plucking

2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1. Withering

2.2. Rolling

2.3. Roll-Breaking

2.4. Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5. Firing & Baking

2.6. Sorting & Grading

3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1. CTC

3.2. Dust grades – Large leaf grades

4. Categories of Tea

4.1. White -

4.2. Green

4.3. Oolong

4.4. Black

4.5. Infusions (Not Tea)

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

• Tea manufacturing Video

• Tea Processing Chart

• Leaf tea grade presenter

• Evaluation sheet

7.0 Practical’s

• Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black

Pages: 1 2 3 4

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes

What you will learn

• The cultivation and harvesting of tea

• The manufacture and processing of leaf tea

• Different Categories of tea

Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1. Nursery

1.2. Cultivation

1.3. Pruning

1.4. Plucking

2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1. Withering

2.2. Rolling

2.3. Roll-Breaking

2.4. Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5. Firing & Baking

2.6. Sorting & Grading

3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1. CTC

3.2. Dust grades – Large leaf grades

4. Categories of Tea

4.1. White -

4.2. Green

4.3. Oolong

4.4. Black

4.5. Infusions (Not Tea)

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

• Tea manufacturing Video

• Tea Processing Chart

• Leaf tea grade presenter

• Evaluation sheet

7.0 Practical’s

• Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black

Pages: 1 2 3

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 
Duration: 30 minutes What you will learn
  • The cultivation and harvesting of tea
  • The manufacture and processing of leaf tea
  • Different Categories of tea
Module Overview
  1. 1. Tea gardens (PP)
1.1.   Nursery 1.2.   Cultivation 1.3.   Pruning 1.4.   Plucking
  1. 2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)
2.1.   Withering 2.2.   Rolling 2.3.   Roll-Breaking 2.4.   Fermentation/Oxidization 2.5.   Firing & Baking 2.6.   Sorting & Grading
  1. 3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)
3.1.   CTC 3.2.   Dust grades – Large leaf grades
  1. 4. Categories of Tea
4.1.   White - 4.2.   Green 4.3.   Oolong 4.4.   Black 4.5.   Infusions (Not Tea) 6. Summary of Videos, Presentations
  • Tea manufacturing Video
  • Tea Processing Chart
  • Leaf tea grade presenter
  • Evaluation sheet
7.0 Practical’s
  • Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes


What you will learn

  • The cultivation and harvesting of tea

  • The manufacture and processing of leaf tea

  • Different Categories of tea


Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1.   Nursery

1.2.   Cultivation

1.3.   Pruning

1.4.   Plucking

2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1.   Withering

2.2.   Rolling

2.3.   Roll-Breaking

2.4.   Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5.   Firing & Baking

2.6.   Sorting & Grading

3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1.   CTC

3.2.   Dust grades – Large leaf grades

4. Categories of Tea

4.1.   White -

4.2.   Green

4.3.   Oolong

4.4.   Black

4.5.   Infusions (Not Tea)

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

Tea manufacturing Video

Tea Processing Chart

Leaf tea grade presenter

Evaluation sheet

7.0 Practical’s

Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black


Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes


What you will learn

  • The cultivation and harvesting of tea

  • The manufacture and processing of leaf tea

  • Different Categories of tea


Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1.   Nursery

1.2.   Cultivation

1.3.   Pruning

1.4.   Plucking

2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1.   Withering

2.2.   Rolling

2.3.   Roll-Breaking

2.4.   Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5.   Firing & Baking

2.6.   Sorting & Grading

3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1.   CTC

3.2.   Dust grades – Large leaf grades

4. Categories of Tea

4.1.   White -

4.2.   Green

4.3.   Oolong

4.4.   Black

4.5.   Infusions (Not Tea)

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

Tea manufacturing Video

Tea Processing Chart

Leaf tea grade presenter

Evaluation sheet

7.0 Practical’s

Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black


Pages: 1 2

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes


What you will learn

  • The cultivation and harvesting of tea

  • The manufacture and processing of leaf tea

  • Different Categories of tea


Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1.   Nursery

1.2.   Cultivation

1.3.   Pruning

1.4.   Plucking

2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1.   Withering

2.2.   Rolling

2.3.   Roll-Breaking

2.4.   Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5.   Firing & Baking

2.6.   Sorting & Grading

3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1.   CTC

3.2.   Dust grades – Large leaf grades

4. Categories of Tea

4.1.   White -

4.2.   Green

4.3.   Oolong

4.4.   Black

4.5.   Infusions (Not Tea)

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

Tea manufacturing Video

Tea Processing Chart

Leaf tea grade presenter

Evaluation sheet

7.0 Practical’s

Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black


Pages: 1 2

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes


What you will learn

  • The cultivation and harvesting of tea

  • The manufacture and processing of leaf tea

  • Different Categories of tea


Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1.   Nursery

1.2.   Cultivation

1.3.   Pruning

1.4.   Plucking

2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1.   Withering

2.2.   Rolling

2.3.   Roll-Breaking

2.4.   Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5.   Firing & Baking

2.6.   Sorting & Grading

3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1.   CTC

3.2.   Dust grades – Large leaf grades

4. Categories of Tea

4.1.   White -

4.2.   Green

4.3.   Oolong

4.4.   Black

4.5.   Infusions (Not Tea)

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

Tea manufacturing Video

Tea Processing Chart

Leaf tea grade presenter

Evaluation sheet

7.0 Practical’s

Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black


Pages: 1 2 3

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes


What you will learn

  • The cultivation and harvesting of tea

  • The manufacture and processing of leaf tea

  • Different Categories of tea


Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1.   Nursery

1.2.   Cultivation

1.3.   Pruning

1.4.   Plucking

2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1.   Withering

2.2.   Rolling

2.3.   Roll-Breaking

2.4.   Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5.   Firing & Baking

2.6.   Sorting & Grading

3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1.   CTC

3.2.   Dust grades – Large leaf grades

4. Categories of Tea

4.1.   White -

4.2.   Green

4.3.   Oolong

4.4.   Black

4.5.   Infusions (Not Tea)

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

Tea manufacturing Video

Tea Processing Chart

Leaf tea grade presenter

Evaluation sheet

7.0 Practical’s

Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black


Pages: 1 2 3

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes


What you will learn

  • The cultivation and harvesting of tea

  • The manufacture and processing of leaf tea

  • Different Categories of tea


Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1.   Nursery

1.2.   Cultivation

1.3.   Pruning

1.4.   Plucking

2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1.   Withering

2.2.   Rolling

2.3.   Roll-Breaking

2.4.   Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5.   Firing & Baking

2.6.   Sorting & Grading

3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1.   CTC

3.2.   Dust grades – Large leaf grades

4. Categories of Tea

4.1.   White -

4.2.   Green

4.3.   Oolong

4.4.   Black

4.5.   Infusions (Not Tea)

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

Tea manufacturing Video

Tea Processing Chart

Leaf tea grade presenter

Evaluation sheet

7.0 Practical’s

Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black


Pages: 1 2 3 4 5

Dimensions of taste and Environmental factors

 


What you will learn

How to taste tea

Dimensions of Taste – The Leaf & The Liquor

Why do two teas, produced in different parts of the world taste different, even if the processing were identical?


Module Overview

1. How to taste tea

1.1. The Basic Tastes

1.2. Dimensions of taste – the leaf & the liquor

1.3. The Nose & the Palate


2. Tasting terms (Workshop)

2.1. Appearance

2.2. Flavour


3. Environmental Factors

3.1. Terroir

2.2. Appreciating the influence of climate and geography


4. Summary of videos and presentations

How to conduct a tea appreciation event – Video

Presenting Watte – Video

Watte Journey tray tasting

Pages: 1 2 3 4

Dimensions of taste and Environmental factors

 


What you will learn

How to taste tea

Dimensions of Taste – The Leaf & The Liquor

Why do two teas, produced in different parts of the world taste different, even if the processing were identical?


Module Overview

1. How to taste tea

1.1. The Basic Tastes

1.2. Dimensions of taste – the leaf & the liquor

1.3. The Nose & the Palate


2. Tasting terms (Workshop)

2.1. Appearance

2.2. Flavour


3. Environmental Factors

2.3. Terrior

2.4. Appreciating the influence of climate and geography


3. Summary of videos and presentations

How to conduct a tea appreciation event – Video

Presenting Watte – Video

Watte Journey tray tasting


The Physiology of Tasting


Sensation - The first part of the taste ‘combination’ is sensation. This is perceived by the taste buds found on the tongue and other sensory tissues around the oral cavity. Here, non-volatile stimuli/sensations such as: salt, sweet, acid (sour) and bitter is perceived. Although all types of taste buds can be found located in the mouth, the taste buds in very specific areas on the tongue are sensitive to specific stimuli.

- sweetness at the tip of the tongue

- saltiness on either side and over the top of the tongue near the front

- sourness along the sides of the tongue but further back

- bitterness on the rear top of the tongue

 

How Professionals Taste Tea


The ‘Taster’ spoons the ‘liquor’, sucking and slurping it into his mouth at a speed of 200 kilometers per hour, whereupon the tea explodes into a fine mist at the back of his palate. Then the liquid is expectorated into a spittoon and the pronouncement is made. Tea and wine tasting have more in common than you & I think.


The Tea Taster


Like wine, when appreciation begins with the proffered bottle, tea connoisseurship begins with the dry leaf. After, the taster establishes different grades, brands or styles of tea just by looking at how leaves react in water. A superior tea’s leaves unfurl and secrete its colour, briskly and regularly as compared to a tea of lesser quality.


Every leaf tells its story


The tea liquid or liquor is then decanted into a bowl. Like the wine drinker who scrutinizes the label, cork and the sediment from a mature bottle, tea tasting is not deemed complete until the dregs or wet leaves are inspected.


Dimensions of Taste – The Leaf & The Liquor


The Dry Leaf


Are the leaves small (broken) or are they large leaves? Are all the pieces the same size or are they of different sizes. Leaf size is an important consideration in tea grading but large doesn’t necessarily mean the resulting tea tastes better. Some of the best tasting teas are made from broken, smaller leaves.


The Infused Leaf and the Liquor


Appreciation of tea begins with the dry leaf. But even more so, with the infused leaf. The wet leaf takes on a sheen and luster that is appreciated. Colour developes. Do leaves take on a reddish tinge?


Leaves usually expand quite significantly in size and also change appearance. You can note the size, shape and whether there are other bits of stem etc.


Liquor – Colour, Shade and Reflection

Dimensions of taste and Environmental factors

 

Duration: 30 minutes


What you will learn

  • How to taste tea
  • Dimensions of Taste – The Leaf & The Liquor
  • Why do two teas, produced in different parts of the world taste different, even if the processing were identical?


Module Overview

1. How to taste tea

1.1.    The Basic Tastes

1.2.    Dimensions of taste – the leaf & the liquor

1.3.    The Nose & the Palate

2. Tasting terms (Workshop)

2.1.    Appearance

2.2.    Flavour

3.   Environmental Factors

2.3.    Terrior

2.4.    Appreciating the influence of climate and geography

4. Summary of videos and presentations

How to conduct a tea appreciation event – Video

Presenting Watte – Video

Watte Journey tray tasting

Dimensions of taste and Environmental factors

 

Duration: 30 minutes


What you will learn

  • How to taste tea
  • Dimensions of Taste – The Leaf & The Liquor
  • Why do two teas, produced in different parts of the world taste different, even if the processing were identical?


Module Overview

1. How to taste tea

1.1.    The Basic Tastes

1.2.    Dimensions of taste – the leaf & the liquor

1.3.    The Nose & the Palate

2. Tasting terms (Workshop)

2.1.    Appearance

2.2.    Flavour

3.   Environmental Factors

2.3.    Terrior

2.4.    Appreciating the influence of climate and geography

4. Summary of videos and presentations

  • How to conduct a tea appreciation event – Video
  • Presenting Watte – Video
  • Watte Journey tray tasting

Dimensions of taste and Environmental factors

 


What you will learn

How to taste tea

Dimensions of Taste – The Leaf & The Liquor

Why do two teas, produced in different parts of the world taste different, even if the processing were identical?


Module Overview

1. How to taste tea

1.1. The Basic Tastes

1.2. Dimensions of taste – the leaf & the liquor

1.3. The Nose & the Palate


2. Tasting terms (Workshop)

2.1. Appearance

2.2. Flavour


3. Environmental Factors

3.1. Terroir

2.2. Appreciating the influence of climate and geography


4. Summary of videos and presentations

How to conduct a tea appreciation event – Video

Presenting Watte – Video

Watte Journey tray tasting

Pages: 1 2 3 4

Dimensions of taste and Environmental factors

 

Duration: 30 minutes


What you will learn

  • How to taste tea
  • Dimensions of Taste – The Leaf & The Liquor
  • Why do two teas, produced in different parts of the world taste different, even if the processing were identical?


Module Overview

1. How to taste tea

1.1.    The Basic Tastes

1.2.    Dimensions of taste – the leaf & the liquor

1.3.    The Nose & the Palate

2. Tasting terms (Workshop)

2.1.    Appearance

2.2.    Flavour

3.   Environmental Factors

2.3.    Terrior

2.4.    Appreciating the influence of climate and geography

4. Summary of videos and presentations

How to conduct a tea appreciation event – Video

Presenting Watte – Video

Watte Journey tray tasting

Pages: 1 2

Dimensions of taste and Environmental factors

 

Duration: 30 minutes


What you will learn

  • How to taste tea
  • Dimensions of Taste – The Leaf & The Liquor
  • Why do two teas, produced in different parts of the world taste different, even if the processing were identical?


Module Overview

1. How to taste tea

1.1.    The Basic Tastes

1.2.    Dimensions of taste – the leaf & the liquor

1.3.    The Nose & the Palate

2. Tasting terms (Workshop)

2.1.    Appearance

2.2.    Flavour

3.   Environmental Factors

2.3.    Terrior

2.4.    Appreciating the influence of climate and geography

4. Summary of videos and presentations

How to conduct a tea appreciation event – Video

Presenting Watte – Video

Watte Journey tray tasting

Pages: 1 2

Dimensions of taste and Environmental factors

 

Duration: 30 minutes


What you will learn

  • How to taste tea
  • Dimensions of Taste – The Leaf & The Liquor
  • Why do two teas, produced in different parts of the world taste different, even if the processing were identical?


Module Overview

1. How to taste tea

1.1.    The Basic Tastes

1.2.    Dimensions of taste – the leaf & the liquor

1.3.    The Nose & the Palate

2. Tasting terms (Workshop)

2.1.    Appearance

2.2.    Flavour

3.   Environmental Factors

2.3.    Terrior

2.4.    Appreciating the influence of climate and geography

4. Summary of videos and presentations

How to conduct a tea appreciation event – Video

Presenting Watte – Video

Watte Journey tray tasting

Dimensions of taste and Environmental factors

 

Duration: 30 minutes


What you will learn

  • How to taste tea
  • Dimensions of Taste – The Leaf & The Liquor
  • Why do two teas, produced in different parts of the world taste different, even if the processing were identical?


Module Overview

1. How to taste tea

1.1.    The Basic Tastes

1.2.    Dimensions of taste – the leaf & the liquor

1.3.    The Nose & the Palate

2. Tasting terms (Workshop)

2.1.    Appearance

2.2.    Flavour

3.   Environmental Factors

2.3.    Terrior

2.4.    Appreciating the influence of climate and geography

4. Summary of videos and presentations

How to conduct a tea appreciation event – Video

Presenting Watte – Video

Watte Journey tray tasting

Pages: 1 2

Dimensions of taste and Environmental factors

 

Duration: 30 minutes


What you will learn

  • How to taste tea
  • Dimensions of Taste – The Leaf & The Liquor
  • Why do two teas, produced in different parts of the world taste different, even if the processing were identical?


Module Overview

1. How to taste tea

1.1.    The Basic Tastes

1.2.    Dimensions of taste – the leaf & the liquor

1.3.    The Nose & the Palate

2. Tasting terms (Workshop)

2.1.    Appearance

2.2.    Flavour

3.   Environmental Factors

2.3.    Terrior

2.4.    Appreciating the influence of climate and geography

4. Summary of videos and presentations

How to conduct a tea appreciation event – Video

Presenting Watte – Video

Watte Journey tray tasting

Pages: 1 2

Dimensions of taste and Environmental factors

 

Duration: 30 minutes


What you will learn

  • How to taste tea
  • Dimensions of Taste – The Leaf & The Liquor
  • Why do two teas, produced in different parts of the world taste different, even if the processing were identical?


Module Overview

1. How to taste tea

1.1.    The Basic Tastes

1.2.    Dimensions of taste – the leaf & the liquor

1.3.    The Nose & the Palate

2. Tasting terms (Workshop)

2.1.    Appearance

2.2.    Flavour

3.   Environmental Factors

2.3.    Terrior

2.4.    Appreciating the influence of climate and geography

4. Summary of videos and presentations

How to conduct a tea appreciation event – Video

Presenting Watte – Video

Watte Journey tray tasting

Pages: 1 2

Dimensions of taste and Environmental factors

 

Duration: 30 minutes


What you will learn

  • How to taste tea
  • Dimensions of Taste – The Leaf & The Liquor
  • Why do two teas, produced in different parts of the world taste different, even if the processing were identical?


Module Overview

1. How to taste tea

1.1.    The Basic Tastes

1.2.    Dimensions of taste – the leaf & the liquor

1.3.    The Nose & the Palate

2. Tasting terms (Workshop)

2.1.    Appearance

2.2.    Flavour

3.   Environmental Factors

2.3.    Terrior

2.4.    Appreciating the influence of climate and geography

4. Summary of videos and presentations

How to conduct a tea appreciation event – Video

Presenting Watte – Video

Watte Journey tray tasting

Pages: 1 2

Dimensions of taste and Environmental factors

 

Duration: 30 minutes


What you will learn

  • How to taste tea
  • Dimensions of Taste – The Leaf & The Liquor
  • Why do two teas, produced in different parts of the world taste different, even if the processing were identical?


Module Overview

1. How to taste tea

1.1.    The Basic Tastes

1.2.    Dimensions of taste – the leaf & the liquor

1.3.    The Nose & the Palate

2. Tasting terms (Workshop)

2.1.    Appearance

2.2.    Flavour

3.   Environmental Factors

2.3.    Terrior

2.4.    Appreciating the influence of climate and geography

4. Summary of videos and presentations

How to conduct a tea appreciation event – Video

Presenting Watte – Video

Watte Journey tray tasting

Pages: 1 2

Dimensions of taste and Environmental factors

 

Duration: 30 minutes


What you will learn

  • How to taste tea
  • Dimensions of Taste – The Leaf & The Liquor
  • Why do two teas, produced in different parts of the world taste different, even if the processing were identical?


Module Overview

1. How to taste tea

1.1.    The Basic Tastes

1.2.    Dimensions of taste – the leaf & the liquor

1.3.    The Nose & the Palate

2. Tasting terms (Workshop)

2.1.    Appearance

2.2.    Flavour

3.   Environmental Factors

2.3.    Terrior

2.4.    Appreciating the influence of climate and geography

4. Summary of videos and presentations

How to conduct a tea appreciation event – Video

Presenting Watte – Video

Watte Journey tray tasting

Pages: 1 2

Dimensions of taste and Environmental factors

 

Duration: 30 minutes


What you will learn

  • How to taste tea
  • Dimensions of Taste – The Leaf & The Liquor
  • Why do two teas, produced in different parts of the world taste different, even if the processing were identical?


Module Overview

1. How to taste tea

1.1.    The Basic Tastes

1.2.    Dimensions of taste – the leaf & the liquor

1.3.    The Nose & the Palate

2. Tasting terms (Workshop)

2.1.    Appearance

2.2.    Flavour

3.   Environmental Factors

2.3.    Terrior

2.4.    Appreciating the influence of climate and geography

4. Summary of videos and presentations

How to conduct a tea appreciation event – Video

Presenting Watte – Video

Watte Journey tray tasting

Pages: 1 2

Dimensions of taste and Environmental factors

 

Duration: 30 minutes


What you will learn

  • How to taste tea
  • Dimensions of Taste – The Leaf & The Liquor
  • Why do two teas, produced in different parts of the world taste different, even if the processing were identical?


Module Overview

1. How to taste tea

1.1.    The Basic Tastes

1.2.    Dimensions of taste – the leaf & the liquor

1.3.    The Nose & the Palate

2. Tasting terms (Workshop)

2.1.    Appearance

2.2.    Flavour

3.   Environmental Factors

2.3.    Terrior

2.4.    Appreciating the influence of climate and geography

4. Summary of videos and presentations

How to conduct a tea appreciation event – Video

Presenting Watte – Video

Watte Journey tray tasting

Pages: 1 2

Food matching with Tea

 


What you will learn

Flavour profiles

Matching tea to different types of food


Module Overview

1. Tea and cuisine

2. Flavour

3. Texture

4. Components

5. Making the match

6. Tea and cheese

7. Tea with chocolates and desserts

8. Summary of videos and presentations

Food pairing with tea presentation

Tea sensory Evaluation sheet

Suggested food matches with tea

Pages: 1 2 3

Dimensions of taste and Environmental factors

 

Duration: 30 minutes


What you will learn

  • How to taste tea
  • Dimensions of Taste – The Leaf & The Liquor
  • Why do two teas, produced in different parts of the world taste different, even if the processing were identical?


Module Overview

1. How to taste tea

1.1.    The Basic Tastes

1.2.    Dimensions of taste – the leaf & the liquor

1.3.    The Nose & the Palate

2. Tasting terms (Workshop)

2.1.    Appearance

2.2.    Flavour

3.   Environmental Factors

2.3.    Terrior

2.4.    Appreciating the influence of climate and geography

4. Summary of videos and presentations

How to conduct a tea appreciation event – Video

Presenting Watte – Video

Watte Journey tray tasting

Pages: 1 2

Food matching with Tea

 

Duration: 15 minutes

What you will learn

  • Flavour profiles
  • Matching tea to different types of food

Module Overview


  1. Tea and cuisine
  2. Flavour
  3. Texture
  4. Components
  5. Making the match
  6. Tea and cheese
  7. Tea with chocolates and desserts
  8. Summary of videos and presentations

Food pairing with tea presentation
Tea sensory Evaluation sheet
Suggested food matches with tea


Food matching with Tea

 

Duration: 15 minutes


What you will learn

  • Flavour profiles
  • Matching tea to different types of food


Module Overview

  1. Tea and cuisine
  2. Flavour
  3. Texture
  4. Components
  5. Making the match
  6. Tea and cheese
  7. Tea with chocolates and desserts
  8. Summary of videos and presentations

8.1. Food pairing with tea presentation
8.2. Tea sensory Evaluation sheet
8.3. Suggested food matches with tea


Food matching with Tea

 


What you will learn

Flavour profiles

Matching tea to different types of food


Module Overview

1. Tea and cuisine

2. Flavour

3. Texture

4. Components

5. Making the match

6. Tea and cheese

7. Tea with chocolates and desserts

8. Summary of videos and presentations

Food pairing with tea presentation

Tea sensory Evaluation sheet

Suggested food matches with tea

Pages: 1 2 3

Food matching with Tea

 

Duration: 15 minutes


What you will learn

  • Flavour profiles
  • Matching tea to different types of food


Module Overview

1. Tea and cuisine
2. Flavour
3. Texture
4. Components
5. Making the match
6. Tea and cheese
7. Tea with chocolates and desserts
8. Summary of videos and presentations

8.1. Food pairing with tea presentation
8.2. Tea sensory Evaluation sheet
8.3. Suggested food matches with tea



Food matching with Tea

 

Duration: 15 minutes


What you will learn

  • Flavour profiles
  • Matching tea to different types of food


Module Overview

1. Tea and cuisine
2. Flavour
3. Texture
4. Components
5. Making the match
6. Tea and cheese
7. Tea with chocolates and desserts
8. Summary of videos and presentations

8.1. Food pairing with tea presentation
8.2. Tea sensory Evaluation sheet
8.3. Suggested food matches with tea

Pages: 1 2

Food matching with Tea

 

Duration: 15 minutes


What you will learn

  • Flavour profiles
  • Matching tea to different types of food


Module Overview

1. Tea and cuisine
2. Flavour
3. Texture
4. Components
5. Making the match
6. Tea and cheese
7. Tea with chocolates and desserts
8. Summary of videos and presentations

8.1. Food pairing with tea presentation
8.2. Tea sensory Evaluation sheet
8.3. Suggested food matches with tea

Pages: 1 2

Frequently asked questions about tea

 

Frequently asked questions about tea

 


What you will learn


- Nutrients in tea – what is in your cup of tea, and how it can affect your body?

- What are the nutritional benefits of tea?

- Does tea affect the absorption of Iron?

- What are antioxidants?

- How much caffeine is there in tea?

- How much caffeine is considered safe?

- Does green tea have the same Caffeine level as black tea?

- Is green tea better for you than black tea?

- Why should one never reboil water when brewing tea?

- Tea and Alzheimer’s

- Tea and Oral Health

- Tea and Stroke

- Tea for Healthy Aging and Longevity

- Does the water affect the tea brew?


Click HERE to download the study material.


 


Frequently asked questions about tea

 


What you will learn


- Nutrients in tea – what is in your cup of tea, and how it can affect your body

- What are the nutritional benefits of tea?

- Does tea affect the absorption of Iron?

- What are antioxidants?

- How much caffeine is there in tea?

- How much caffeine is considered safe?

- Does green tea have the same Caffeine level as black tea?

- Is green tea better for you than black tea?

- Why should one never reboil water when brewing tea?

- Tea and Alzheimer’s

- Tea and Oral Health

- Tea and Stroke

- Tea for Healthy Aging and Longevity

- Does the water affect the tea brew?


Click HERE to download the study material.


FAQ

 

FAQ

Frequently asked questions about tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes


What you will learn

  • Nutrients in tea what is in your cup of tea, and how it
  • can affect your body
  • What are the nutritional benefits of tea?
  • Does tea affect the absorption of Iron?
  • What are antioxidants?
  • How much caffeine is there in tea?
  • How much caffeine is considered safe?
  • Does green tea have the same Caffeine level as black
  • tea?
  • Is green tea better for you than black tea?
  • Why should one never reboil water when brewing tea?
  • Tea and Alzheimer’s
  • Tea and Oral Health
  • Tea and Stroke
  • Tea for Healthy Aging and Longevity
  • Does the water affect the tea brew?


Frequently asked questions about tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes


What you will learn

  • Nutrients in tea what is in your cup of tea, and how it can affect your body
  • What are the nutritional benefits of tea?
  • Does tea affect the absorption of Iron?
  • What are antioxidants?
  • How much caffeine is there in tea?
  • How much caffeine is considered safe?
  • Does green tea have the same Caffeine level as black tea?
  • Is green tea better for you than black tea?
  • Why should one never reboil water when brewing tea?
  • Tea and Alzheimer’s
  • Tea and Oral Health
  • Tea and Stroke
  • Tea for Healthy Aging and Longevity
  • Does the water affect the tea brew?


Click HERE to download the study material.


How to brew a perfect cup of tea

 


What you will learn

How to brew a perfect cup of tea

How to serve a fine cup of tea

How to advice a guest and give recommendations  via a menu on the tea selection

Give recommendations to a guest on food pairing with tea

Create your own tea experience


Module Overview

1. The finer points in brewing

1.1.    The importance of water

1.2.    Water temperature

1.3.    How much tea to be used

1.4.    How much water

1.5.    Brewing times

1.6.    Adding enhancements


2. Brewing tea

2.1.    Luxury leaf tea bags

2.2.    Leaf Tea


3.   Serving and experiencing tea

3.3.    Professional tea set

3.4.    Tall tea glass with strainer

3.5.    Thetiere – Plunger

3.6.    Tea cup and pot


4. Summary of videos and presentations

- Finer points in brewing video

- Essential information for a tea service


5. Examination

- Finer points in brewing



There is only one right way to brew tea.

Most tea drinkers fail ensure the quality of tea in their cup and in the process lose the pleasure and natural goodness in tea. Please follow our simple guidelines to ensure that your cup of Dilmah is perfectly prepared.


THE FIRST STEP : the tea – Most importantly is to use good quality, fresh and origin packed tea of course! – Tea that is garden fresh, unblended, of Single Origin, Single Region or Single Estate and packed at source, is more authentic, but also richer in flavour and natural anti oxidants. As tea ages in ships, warehouses and as, in most cases today, when tea is blended with other teas to reduce cost, it loses freshness, absorbing moisture, developing various bacteria and in the process losing the flavour and antioxidants that nature has blessed good tea with. Since our father, Merrill J Fernando founded Dilmah, we have maintained a commitment to Single Origin Tea to offer our customer the most enjoyable and also genuinely ethical tea experience.



THE SECOND STEP : the water – Good tea needs good water. Most people think of water as ‘just water”. It is not so because there is hard water, chlorinated water, water with various chemicals, including fluoride, water with natural minerals including calcium, which could significantly retard the quality of tea. Generally, if you live in an area where the water is hard, heavily chlorinated, with fluoride or calcium, we suggest that you use a water filter. Brita is one brand whose filters we have tested and found to be effective in removing impurities in water. The perfect option though, especially for Seasonal Flush is of course natural spring water. Evian and Highland Spring are brands that we can suggest although there are other good quality spring water brands depending on where you live.

 

THE THIRD STEP : boiling – The water needs to be boiled in a clean and a dry kettle. Boil just once since excessive boiling causes the water to lose carbon dioxide and oxygen which are important elements in the exaction and presentation of flavour and character in tea. Water that has been boiled continuously or boiled several times loses these dissolved gasses and can acquire an unpleasant metallic taste.


THE FOURTH STEP : brewing – The freshly boiled water should them be poured on to your tea. In the case of leaf tea, 2.5 g. (approx. one heaped teaspoonful) or 1 tea bag per 220 ml. of water water. Ideally use white porcelain cups or mugs and pour the freshly, and once boiled water directly on to the teabag or leaf tea. Stir once or twice to start the brewing and then cover the cup or mug with a lid or saucer. After 2 minutes stir again and leave for a further minute.


In the case of black tea, brew for at least 3 minutes, if you would like your tea very strong, brew up to 5 minutes but no longer as your tea can become bitter if brewed for morethan 5 minutes. If you prefer your tea weak, brew for 3 minutes and then add hot water to dilute the tea to taste. It is important that you brew for at least 3 minutes in order to extract the flavour and natural goodness in tea. Diluting thereafter will meet your requirement for a weak tea if that is your preference. After brewing, strain the leaf tea using a stainless steel strainer, or remove the teabag if you are using teabags, and serve.


Offering fine tea in white Chinaware enhance the appreciation of tea by showing the hues and colours of tea properly. The spectrum of colour that tea represents extends from the pale, honey tinged liquors of White Tea to the dark and powerful infusion of PuErh.

Good tea, especially rare, seasonal teas are best taken straight. Adding anything to tea compromising the subtle flavours which are delicate and complex. However if you enjoy milk with your tea, choose a strong tea like our English Breakfast, Irish Breakfast or Ceylon Supreme and add warm dairy milk.. If you enjoy sweetness in your tea, try a light honey as a substitute to sugar, in order to keep your tea as natural as possible.


The principle of adding anything to tea is based on achieving a fine balance of flavour. Our Seasonal Flush Teas offer subtle and very delicate flavour and texture, which would be ecompletely overcome by the addition of sugar, milk, honey etc. The same goes for White Tea (real white tea that is) which is supremely delicate and cannot take any additions. However, with stronger teas with body and character, a balance can be achieved. Adding a twist of Lemon or a wedge of Orange to a bright and strong Ceylon Tea like our Perfect Ceylon Tea (in the Exceptional Tea range), or to our Brilliant Breakfast (in the t-Series, designer gourmet tea) can enhance your tea experience for the character and personality of the tea is not compromised but enhance. The taste of tea is in harmony with the taste of the Lemon or Orange.


t Series Brewing a perfect cup of t luxury leaf tea bag

t Series training Brewing Cuppa t in porcelain

t Series training Brewing instruction

t Series training Brewing Tall Tea Glass with strainer

t Series training Finer points for brewing

t Series training Professional t service

t Series training Serving suggestions






What you will learn

· How to brew a perfect cup of tea

· How to serve a fine cup of tea

· How to advice guest and give recommendations  via a menu on the tea selection

· Give recommendations to guest on food pairing with tea

· Create your own tea experience

Module Overview

1. The finer points in brewing

1.1. The importance of water

1.2. Water temperature

1.3. How much tea to be used

1.4. How much water

1.5. Brewing times

1.6. Adding enhancements

 

2. Brewing tea

2.1. Luxury leaf tea bags

2.2. Leaf Tea

3.   Serving and experiencing tea

2.3. Professional tea set

2.4. Tall tea glass with strainer

2.5. Thetiere – Plunger

2.6. Tea cup and pot

 

 

 

3. Summary of videos and presentations

  • Finer points in brewing video
  • Essential information for a tea service

 

4. Examination

  • Finer points in brewing

How to brew a perfect cup of tea

 

What you will learn

  • How to brew a perfect cup of tea
  • How to serve a fine cup of tea
  • How to advice guest and give recommendations  via a menu on the tea selection
  • Give recommendations to guest on food pairing with tea
  • Create your own tea experience


Module Overview

1. The finer points in brewing

1.1.    The importance of water

1.2.    Water temperature

1.3.    How much tea to be used

1.4.    How much water

1.5.    Brewing times

1.6.    Adding enhancements

2. Brewing tea

2.1.    Luxury leaf tea bags

2.2.    Leaf Tea


3.   Serving and experiencing tea

2.3.    Professional tea set

2.4.    Tall tea glass with strainer

2.5.    Thetiere – Plunger

2.6.    Tea cup and pot


4. Summary of videos and presentations

  • Finer points in brewing video
  • Essential information for a tea service


5. Examination

  • Finer points in brewing

How to brew a perfect cup of tea

 


What you will learn

How to brew a perfect cup of tea

How to serve a fine cup of tea

How to advice a guest and give recommendations  via a menu on the tea selection

Give recommendations to a guest on food pairing with tea

Create your own tea experience


Module Overview

1. The finer points in brewing

1.1.    The importance of water

1.2.    Water temperature

1.3.    How much tea to be used

1.4.    How much water

1.5.    Brewing times

1.6.    Adding enhancements


2. Brewing tea

2.1.    Luxury leaf tea bags

2.2.    Leaf Tea


3.   Serving and experiencing tea

3.3.    Professional tea set

3.4.    Tall tea glass with strainer

3.5.    Thetiere – Plunger

3.6.    Tea cup and pot


4. Summary of videos and presentations

- Finer points in brewing video

- Essential information for a tea service


5. Examination

- Finer points in brewing



There is only one right way to brew tea.

Most tea drinkers fail ensure the quality of tea in their cup and in the process lose the pleasure and natural goodness in tea. Please follow our simple guidelines to ensure that your cup of Dilmah is perfectly prepared.


THE FIRST STEP : the tea – Most importantly is to use good quality, fresh and origin packed tea of course! – Tea that is garden fresh, unblended, of Single Origin, Single Region or Single Estate and packed at source, is more authentic, but also richer in flavour and natural anti oxidants. As tea ages in ships, warehouses and as, in most cases today, when tea is blended with other teas to reduce cost, it loses freshness, absorbing moisture, developing various bacteria and in the process losing the flavour and antioxidants that nature has blessed good tea with. Since our father, Merrill J Fernando founded Dilmah, we have maintained a commitment to Single Origin Tea to offer our customer the most enjoyable and also genuinely ethical tea experience.



THE SECOND STEP : the water – Good tea needs good water. Most people think of water as ‘just water”. It is not so because there is hard water, chlorinated water, water with various chemicals, including fluoride, water with natural minerals including calcium, which could significantly retard the quality of tea. Generally, if you live in an area where the water is hard, heavily chlorinated, with fluoride or calcium, we suggest that you use a water filter. Brita is one brand whose filters we have tested and found to be effective in removing impurities in water. The perfect option though, especially for Seasonal Flush is of course natural spring water. Evian and Highland Spring are brands that we can suggest although there are other good quality spring water brands depending on where you live.

 

THE THIRD STEP : boiling – The water needs to be boiled in a clean and a dry kettle. Boil just once since excessive boiling causes the water to lose carbon dioxide and oxygen which are important elements in the exaction and presentation of flavour and character in tea. Water that has been boiled continuously or boiled several times loses these dissolved gasses and can acquire an unpleasant metallic taste.


THE FOURTH STEP : brewing – The freshly boiled water should them be poured on to your tea. In the case of leaf tea, 2.5 g. (approx. one heaped teaspoonful) or 1 tea bag per 220 ml. of water water. Ideally use white porcelain cups or mugs and pour the freshly, and once boiled water directly on to the teabag or leaf tea. Stir once or twice to start the brewing and then cover the cup or mug with a lid or saucer. After 2 minutes stir again and leave for a further minute.


In the case of black tea, brew for at least 3 minutes, if you would like your tea very strong, brew up to 5 minutes but no longer as your tea can become bitter if brewed for morethan 5 minutes. If you prefer your tea weak, brew for 3 minutes and then add hot water to dilute the tea to taste. It is important that you brew for at least 3 minutes in order to extract the flavour and natural goodness in tea. Diluting thereafter will meet your requirement for a weak tea if that is your preference. After brewing, strain the leaf tea using a stainless steel strainer, or remove the teabag if you are using teabags, and serve.


Offering fine tea in white Chinaware enhance the appreciation of tea by showing the hues and colours of tea properly. The spectrum of colour that tea represents extends from the pale, honey tinged liquors of White Tea to the dark and powerful infusion of PuErh.

Good tea, especially rare, seasonal teas are best taken straight. Adding anything to tea compromising the subtle flavours which are delicate and complex. However if you enjoy milk with your tea, choose a strong tea like our English Breakfast, Irish Breakfast or Ceylon Supreme and add warm dairy milk.. If you enjoy sweetness in your tea, try a light honey as a substitute to sugar, in order to keep your tea as natural as possible.


The principle of adding anything to tea is based on achieving a fine balance of flavour. Our Seasonal Flush Teas offer subtle and very delicate flavour and texture, which would be ecompletely overcome by the addition of sugar, milk, honey etc. The same goes for White Tea (real white tea that is) which is supremely delicate and cannot take any additions. However, with stronger teas with body and character, a balance can be achieved. Adding a twist of Lemon or a wedge of Orange to a bright and strong Ceylon Tea like our Perfect Ceylon Tea (in the Exceptional Tea range), or to our Brilliant Breakfast (in the t-Series, designer gourmet tea) can enhance your tea experience for the character and personality of the tea is not compromised but enhance. The taste of tea is in harmony with the taste of the Lemon or Orange.


t Series Brewing a perfect cup of t luxury leaf tea bag

t Series training Brewing Cuppa t in porcelain

t Series training Brewing instruction

t Series training Brewing Tall Tea Glass with strainer

t Series training Finer points for brewing

t Series training Professional t service

t Series training Serving suggestions

 






What you will learn

· How to brew a perfect cup of tea

· How to serve a fine cup of tea

· How to advice guest and give recommendations  via a menu on the tea selection

· Give recommendations to guest on food pairing with tea

· Create your own tea experience

Module Overview

1. The finer points in brewing

1.1. The importance of water

1.2. Water temperature

1.3. How much tea to be used

1.4. How much water

1.5. Brewing times

1.6. Adding enhancements

 

2. Brewing tea

2.1. Luxury leaf tea bags

2.2. Leaf Tea

3.   Serving and experiencing tea

2.3. Professional tea set

2.4. Tall tea glass with strainer

2.5. Thetiere – Plunger

2.6. Tea cup and pot

 

 

 

3. Summary of videos and presentations

  • Finer points in brewing video
  • Essential information for a tea service

 

4. Examination

  • Finer points in brewing

How to brew a perfect cup of tea

 

What you will learn

  • How to brew a perfect cup of tea
  • How to serve a fine cup of tea
  • How to advice guest and give recommendations  via a menu on the tea selection
  • Give recommendations to guest on food pairing with tea
  • Create your own tea experience


Module Overview

1. The finer points in brewing

1.1.    The importance of water

1.2.    Water temperature

1.3.    How much tea to be used

1.4.    How much water

1.5.    Brewing times

1.6.    Adding enhancements

2. Brewing tea

2.1.    Luxury leaf tea bags

2.2.    Leaf Tea


3.   Serving and experiencing tea

2.3.    Professional tea set

2.4.    Tall tea glass with strainer

2.5.    Thetiere – Plunger

2.6.    Tea cup and pot


4. Summary of videos and presentations

  • Finer points in brewing video
  • Essential information for a tea service


5. Examination

  • Finer points in brewing

How to brew a perfect cup of tea

 

hat you will learn

  • How to brew a perfect cup of tea
  • How to serve a fine cup of tea
  • How to advice guest and give recommendations  via a menu on the tea selection
  • Give recommendations to guest on food pairing with tea
  • Create your own tea experience


Module Overview

1. The finer points in brewing

1.1.    The importance of water

1.2.    Water temperature

1.3.    How much tea to be used

1.4.    How much water

1.5.    Brewing times

1.6.    Adding enhancements


2. Brewing tea

2.1.    Luxury leaf tea bags

2.2.    Leaf Tea


3.   Serving and experiencing tea

2.3.    Professional tea set

2.4.    Tall tea glass with strainer

2.5.    Thetiere – Plunger

2.6.    Tea cup and pot


4. Summary of videos and presentations

  • Finer points in brewing video
  • Essential information for a tea service


5. Examination

  • Finer points in brewing



BREWING THE PERFECT CUP OF TEA

There is only one right way to brew tea. Most tea drinkers fail ensure the quality of tea in their cup and in the process lose the pleasure and natural goodness in tea. Please follow our simple guidelines to ensure that your cup of Dilmah is perfectly prepared.


THE FIRST STEP : the tea – Most importantly is to use good quality, fresh and origin packed tea of course! – Tea that is garden fresh, unblended, of Single Origin, Single Region or Single Estate and packed at source, is more authentic, but also richer in flavour and natural anti oxidants. As tea ages in ships, warehouses and as, in most cases today, when tea is blended with other teas to reduce cost, it loses freshness, absorbing moisture, developing various bacteria and in the process losing the flavour and antioxidants that nature has blessed good tea with. Since our father, Merrill J Fernando founded Dilmah, we have maintained a commitment to Single Origin Tea to offer our customer the most enjoyable and also genuinely ethical tea experience.


THE SECOND STEP : the water – Good tea needs good water. Most people think of water as ‘just water”. It is not so because there is hard water, chlorinated water, water with various chemicals, including fluoride, water with natural minerals including calcium, which could significantly retard the quality of tea. Generally, if you live in an area where the water is hard, heavily chlorinated, with fluoride or calcium, we suggest that you use a water filter. Brita is one brand whose filters we have tested and found to be effective in removing impurities in water. The perfect option though, especially for Seasonal Flush is of course natural spring water. Evian and Highland Spring are brands that we can suggest although there are other good quality spring water brands depending on where you live.


THE THIRD STEP : boiling – The water needs to be boiled in a clean and a dry kettle. Boil just once since excessive boiling causes the water to lose carbon dioxide and oxygen which are important elements in the exaction and presentation of flavour and character in tea. Water that has been boiled continuously or boiled several times loses these dissolved gasses and can acquire an unpleasant metallic taste.


THE FOURTH STEP : brewing – The freshly boiled water should them be poured on to your tea. In the case of leaf tea, 2.5 g. (approx. one heaped teaspoonful) or 1 tea bag per 220 ml. of water water. Ideally use white porcelain cups or mugs and pour the freshly, and once boiled water directly on to the teabag or leaf tea. Stir once or twice to start the brewing and then cover the cup or mug with a lid or saucer. After 2 minutes stir again and leave for a further minute.


In the case of black tea, brew for at least 3 minutes, if you would like your tea very strong, brew up to 5 minutes but no longer as your tea can become bitter if brewed for morethan 5 minutes. If you prefer your tea weak, brew for 3 minutes and then add hot water to dilute the tea to taste. It is important that you brew for at least 3 minutes in order to extract the flavour and natural goodness in tea. Diluting thereafter will meet your requirement for a weak tea if that is your preference. After brewing, strain the leaf tea using a stainless steel strainer, or remove the teabag if you are using teabags, and serve.

Offering fine tea in white Chinaware enhance the appreciation of tea by showing the hues and colours of tea properly. The spectrum of colour that tea represents extends from the pale, honey tinged liquors of White Tea to the dark and powerful infusion of PuErh.
Good tea, especially rare, seasonal teas are best taken straight. Adding anything to tea compromising the subtle flavours which are delicate and complex. However if you enjoy milk with your tea, choose a strong tea like our English Breakfast, Irish Breakfast or Ceylon Supreme and add warm dairy milk.. If you enjoy sweetness in your tea, try a light honey as a substitute to sugar, in order to keep your tea as natural as possible.


The principle of adding anything to tea is based on achieving a fine balance of flavour. Our Seasonal Flush Teas offer subtle and very delicate flavour and texture, which would be ecompletely overcome by the addition of sugar, milk, honey etc. The same goes for White Tea (real white tea that is) which is supremely delicate and cannot take any additions. However, with stronger teas with body and character, a balance can be achieved. Adding a twist of Lemon or a wedge of Orange to a bright and strong Ceylon Tea like our Perfect Ceylon Tea (in the Exceptional Tea range), or to our Brilliant Breakfast (in the t-Series, designer gourmet tea) can enhance your tea experience for the character and personality of the tea is not compromised but enhance. The taste of tea is in harmony with the taste of the Lemon or Orange.

How to brew a perfect cup of tea

 

hat you will learn

  • How to brew a perfect cup of tea
  • How to serve a fine cup of tea
  • How to advice guest and give recommendations  via a menu on the tea selection
  • Give recommendations to guest on food pairing with tea
  • Create your own tea experience


Module Overview

1. The finer points in brewing

1.1.    The importance of water

1.2.    Water temperature

1.3.    How much tea to be used

1.4.    How much water

1.5.    Brewing times

1.6.    Adding enhancements


2. Brewing tea

2.1.    Luxury leaf tea bags

2.2.    Leaf Tea


3.   Serving and experiencing tea

2.3.    Professional tea set

2.4.    Tall tea glass with strainer

2.5.    Thetiere – Plunger

2.6.    Tea cup and pot


4. Summary of videos and presentations

  • Finer points in brewing video
  • Essential information for a tea service


5. Examination

  • Finer points in brewing



BREWING THE PERFECT CUP OF TEA

There is only one right way to brew tea. Most tea drinkers fail ensure the quality of tea in their cup and in the process lose the pleasure and natural goodness in tea. Please follow our simple guidelines to ensure that your cup of Dilmah is perfectly prepared.

THE FIRST STEP : the tea – Most importantly is to use good quality, fresh and origin packed tea of course! – Tea that is garden fresh, unblended, of Single Origin, Single Region or Single Estate and packed at source, is more authentic, but also richer in flavour and natural anti oxidants. As tea ages in ships, warehouses and as, in most cases today, when tea is blended with other teas to reduce cost, it loses freshness, absorbing moisture, developing various bacteria and in the process losing the flavour and antioxidants that nature has blessed good tea with. Since our father, Merrill J Fernando founded Dilmah, we have maintained a commitment to Single Origin Tea to offer our customer the most enjoyable and also genuinely ethical tea experience.

THE SECOND STEP : the water – Good tea needs good water. Most people think of water as ‘just water”. It is not so because there is hard water, chlorinated water, water with various chemicals, including fluoride, water with natural minerals including calcium, which could significantly retard the quality of tea. Generally, if you live in an area where the water is hard, heavily chlorinated, with fluoride or calcium, we suggest that you use a water filter. Brita is one brand whose filters we have tested and found to be effective in removing impurities in water. The perfect option though, especially for Seasonal Flush is of course natural spring water. Evian and Highland Spring are brands that we can suggest although there are other good quality spring water brands depending on where you live.

THE THIRD STEP : boiling – The water needs to be boiled in a clean and a dry kettle. Boil just once since excessive boiling causes the water to lose carbon dioxide and oxygen which are important elements in the exaction and presentation of flavour and character in tea. Water that has been boiled continuously or boiled several times loses these dissolved gasses and can acquire an unpleasant metallic taste.

THE FOURTH STEP : brewing – The freshly boiled water should them be poured on to your tea. In the case of leaf tea, 2.5 g. (approx. one heaped teaspoonful) or 1 tea bag per 220 ml. of water water. Ideally use white porcelain cups or mugs and pour the freshly, and once boiled water directly on to the teabag or leaf tea. Stir once or twice to start the brewing and then cover the cup or mug with a lid or saucer. After 2 minutes stir again and leave for a further minute.

In the case of black tea, brew for at least 3 minutes, if you would like your tea very strong, brew up to 5 minutes but no longer as your tea can become bitter if brewed for morethan 5 minutes. If you prefer your tea weak, brew for 3 minutes and then add hot water to dilute the tea to taste. It is important that you brew for at least 3 minutes in order to extract the flavour and natural goodness in tea. Diluting thereafter will meet your requirement for a weak tea if that is your preference. After brewing, strain the leaf tea using a stainless steel strainer, or remove the teabag if you are using teabags, and serve.

Offering fine tea in white Chinaware enhance the appreciation of tea by showing the hues and colours of tea properly. The spectrum of colour that tea represents extends from the pale, honey tinged liquors of White Tea to the dark and powerful infusion of PuErh. Good tea, especially rare, seasonal teas are best taken straight. Adding anything to tea compromising the subtle flavours which are delicate and complex. However if you enjoy milk with your tea, choose a strong tea like our English Breakfast, Irish Breakfast or Ceylon Supreme and add warm dairy milk.. If you enjoy sweetness in your tea, try a light honey as a substitute to sugar, in order to keep your tea as natural as possible.

The principle of adding anything to tea is based on achieving a fine balance of flavour. Our Seasonal Flush Teas offer subtle and very delicate flavour and texture, which would be ecompletely overcome by the addition of sugar, milk, honey etc. The same goes for White Tea (real white tea that is) which is supremely delicate and cannot take any additions. However, with stronger teas with body and character, a balance can be achieved. Adding a twist of Lemon or a wedge of Orange to a bright and strong Ceylon Tea like our Perfect Ceylon Tea (in the Exceptional Tea range), or to our Brilliant Breakfast (in the t-Series, designer gourmet tea) can enhance your tea experience for the character and personality of the tea is not compromised but enhance. The taste of tea is in harmony with the taste of the Lemon or Orange.

When?

 

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 

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Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes


What you will learn

  • The cultivation and harvesting of tea

  • The manufacture and processing of leaf tea

  • Different Categories of tea


Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1.   Nursery

1.2.   Cultivation

1.3.   Pruning

1.4.   Plucking

2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1.   Withering

2.2.   Rolling

2.3.   Roll-Breaking

2.4.   Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5.   Firing & Baking

2.6.   Sorting & Grading

3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1.   CTC

3.2.   Dust grades – Large leaf grades

4. Categories of Tea

4.1.   White -

4.2.   Green

4.3.   Oolong

4.4.   Black

4.5.   Infusions (Not Tea)

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

Tea manufacturing Video

Tea Processing Chart

Leaf tea grade presenter

Evaluation sheet

7.0 Practical’s

Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black


Pages: 1 2 3 4

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes


What you will learn

  • The cultivation and harvesting of tea

  • The manufacture and processing of leaf tea

  • Different Categories of tea


Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1.   Nursery

1.2.   Cultivation

1.3.   Pruning

1.4.   Plucking

2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1.   Withering

2.2.   Rolling

2.3.   Roll-Breaking

2.4.   Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5.   Firing & Baking

2.6.   Sorting & Grading

3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1.   CTC

3.2.   Dust grades – Large leaf grades

4. Categories of Tea

4.1.   White -

4.2.   Green

4.3.   Oolong

4.4.   Black

4.5.   Infusions (Not Tea)

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

Tea manufacturing Video

Tea Processing Chart

Leaf tea grade presenter

Evaluation sheet

7.0 Practical’s

Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black


Pages: 1 2 3 4

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes


What you will learn

  • The cultivation and harvesting of tea

  • The manufacture and processing of leaf tea

  • Different Categories of tea


Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1.   Nursery

1.2.   Cultivation

1.3.   Pruning

1.4.   Plucking

2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1.   Withering

2.2.   Rolling

2.3.   Roll-Breaking

2.4.   Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5.   Firing & Baking

2.6.   Sorting & Grading

3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1.   CTC

3.2.   Dust grades – Large leaf grades

4. Categories of Tea

4.1.   White -

4.2.   Green

4.3.   Oolong

4.4.   Black

4.5.   Infusions (Not Tea)

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

Tea manufacturing Video

Tea Processing Chart

Leaf tea grade presenter

Evaluation sheet

7.0 Practical’s

Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black


Pages: 1 2 3 4

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes


What you will learn

  • The cultivation and harvesting of tea

  • The manufacture and processing of leaf tea

  • Different Categories of tea


Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1.   Nursery

1.2.   Cultivation

1.3.   Pruning

1.4.   Plucking

2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1.   Withering

2.2.   Rolling

2.3.   Roll-Breaking

2.4.   Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5.   Firing & Baking

2.6.   Sorting & Grading

3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1.   CTC

3.2.   Dust grades – Large leaf grades

4. Categories of Tea

4.1.   White -

4.2.   Green

4.3.   Oolong

4.4.   Black

4.5.   Infusions (Not Tea)

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

Tea manufacturing Video

Tea Processing Chart

Leaf tea grade presenter

Evaluation sheet

7.0 Practical’s

Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black


Pages: 1 2 3 4

Manufacturing process and categories of tea

 

Duration: 30 minutes


What you will learn

  • The cultivation and harvesting of tea

  • The manufacture and processing of leaf tea

  • Different Categories of tea


Module Overview

1. Tea gardens (PP)

1.1.   Nursery

1.2.   Cultivation

1.3.   Pruning

1.4.   Plucking

2. Tea Factory – Orthodox Manufacture ( Video +PP)

2.1.   Withering

2.2.   Rolling

2.3.   Roll-Breaking

2.4.   Fermentation/Oxidization

2.5.   Firing & Baking

2.6.   Sorting & Grading

3. Grades of Tea (PP + Workshop)

3.1.   CTC

3.2.   Dust grades – Large leaf grades

4. Categories of Tea

4.1.   White -

4.2.   Green

4.3.   Oolong

4.4.   Black

4.5.   Infusions (Not Tea)

6. Summary of Videos, Presentations

Tea manufacturing Video

Tea Processing Chart

Leaf tea grade presenter

Evaluation sheet

7.0 Practical’s

Tasting of Tea Categories – White, Green, Oolong and Black


Pages: 1 2 3 4

SOT_manufacturing

 

SOT_manufacturing

How to brew a perfect cup of tea

 

hat you will learn

  • How to brew a perfect cup of tea
  • How to serve a fine cup of tea
  • How to advice guest and give recommendations  via a menu on the tea selection
  • Give recommendations to guest on food pairing with tea
  • Create your own tea experience


Module Overview

1. The finer points in brewing

1.1.    The importance of water

1.2.    Water temperature

1.3.    How much tea to be used

1.4.    How much water

1.5.    Brewing times

1.6.    Adding enhancements


2. Brewing tea

2.1.    Luxury leaf tea bags

2.2.    Leaf Tea


3.   Serving and experiencing tea

2.3.    Professional tea set

2.4.    Tall tea glass with strainer

2.5.    Thetiere – Plunger

2.6.    Tea cup and pot


4. Summary of videos and presentations

  • Finer points in brewing video
  • Essential information for a tea service


5. Examination

  • Finer points in brewing



BREWING THE PERFECT CUP OF TEA

There is only one right way to brew tea. Most tea drinkers fail ensure the quality of tea in their cup and in the process lose the pleasure and natural goodness in tea. Please follow our simple guidelines to ensure that your cup of Dilmah is perfectly prepared.


THE FIRST STEP : the tea – Most importantly is to use good quality, fresh and origin packed tea of course! – Tea that is garden fresh, unblended, of Single Origin, Single Region or Single Estate and packed at source, is more authentic, but also richer in flavour and natural anti oxidants. As tea ages in ships, warehouses and as, in most cases today, when tea is blended with other teas to reduce cost, it loses freshness, absorbing moisture, developing various bacteria and in the process losing the flavour and antioxidants that nature has blessed good tea with. Since our father, Merrill J Fernando founded Dilmah, we have maintained a commitment to Single Origin Tea to offer our customer the most enjoyable and also genuinely ethical tea experience.


THE SECOND STEP : the water – Good tea needs good water. Most people think of water as ‘just water”. It is not so because there is hard water, chlorinated water, water with various chemicals, including fluoride, water with natural minerals including calcium, which could significantly retard the quality of tea. Generally, if you live in an area where the water is hard, heavily chlorinated, with fluoride or calcium, we suggest that you use a water filter. Brita is one brand whose filters we have tested and found to be effective in removing impurities in water. The perfect option though, especially for Seasonal Flush is of course natural spring water. Evian and Highland Spring are brands that we can suggest although there are other good quality spring water brands depending on where you live.


THE THIRD STEP : boiling – The water needs to be boiled in a clean and a dry kettle. Boil just once since excessive boiling causes the water to lose carbon dioxide and oxygen which are important elements in the exaction and presentation of flavour and character in tea. Water that has been boiled continuously or boiled several times loses these dissolved gasses and can acquire an unpleasant metallic taste.


THE FOURTH STEP : brewing – The freshly boiled water should them be poured on to your tea. In the case of leaf tea, 2.5 g. (approx. one heaped teaspoonful) or 1 tea bag per 220 ml. of water water. Ideally use white porcelain cups or mugs and pour the freshly, and once boiled water directly on to the teabag or leaf tea. Stir once or twice to start the brewing and then cover the cup or mug with a lid or saucer. After 2 minutes stir again and leave for a further minute.


In the case of black tea, brew for at least 3 minutes, if you would like your tea very strong, brew up to 5 minutes but no longer as your tea can become bitter if brewed for morethan 5 minutes. If you prefer your tea weak, brew for 3 minutes and then add hot water to dilute the tea to taste. It is important that you brew for at least 3 minutes in order to extract the flavour and natural goodness in tea. Diluting thereafter will meet your requirement for a weak tea if that is your preference. After brewing, strain the leaf tea using a stainless steel strainer, or remove the teabag if you are using teabags, and serve.


Offering fine tea in white Chinaware enhance the appreciation of tea by showing the hues and colours of tea properly. The spectrum of colour that tea represents extends from the pale, honey tinged liquors of White Tea to the dark and powerful infusion of PuErh. Good tea, especially rare, seasonal teas are best taken straight. Adding anything to tea compromising the subtle flavours which are delicate and complex. However if you enjoy milk with your tea, choose a strong tea like our English Breakfast, Irish Breakfast or Ceylon Supreme and add warm dairy milk.. If you enjoy sweetness in your tea, try a light honey as a substitute to sugar, in order to keep your tea as natural as possible.


The principle of adding anything to tea is based on achieving a fine balance of flavour. Our Seasonal Flush Teas offer subtle and very delicate flavour and texture, which would be ecompletely overcome by the addition of sugar, milk, honey etc. The same goes for White Tea (real white tea that is) which is supremely delicate and cannot take any additions. However, with stronger teas with body and character, a balance can be achieved. Adding a twist of Lemon or a wedge of Orange to a bright and strong Ceylon Tea like our Perfect Ceylon Tea (in the Exceptional Tea range), or to our Brilliant Breakfast (in the t-Series, designer gourmet tea) can enhance your tea experience for the character and personality of the tea is not compromised but enhance. The taste of tea is in harmony with the taste of the Lemon or Orange.

How to brew a perfect cup of tea

 

hat you will learn

  • How to brew a perfect cup of tea
  • How to serve a fine cup of tea
  • How to advice guest and give recommendations  via a menu on the tea selection
  • Give recommendations to guest on food pairing with tea
  • Create your own tea experience


Module Overview

1. The finer points in brewing

1.1.    The importance of water

1.2.    Water temperature

1.3.    How much tea to be used

1.4.    How much water

1.5.    Brewing times

1.6.    Adding enhancements


2. Brewing tea

2.1.    Luxury leaf tea bags

2.2.    Leaf Tea


3.   Serving and experiencing tea

2.3.    Professional tea set

2.4.    Tall tea glass with strainer

2.5.    Thetiere – Plunger

2.6.    Tea cup and pot


4. Summary of videos and presentations

  • Finer points in brewing video
  • Essential information for a tea service


5. Examination

  • Finer points in brewing



BREWING THE PERFECT CUP OF TEA

There is only one right way to brew tea. Most tea drinkers fail ensure the quality of tea in their cup and in the process lose the pleasure and natural goodness in tea. Please follow our simple guidelines to ensure that your cup of Dilmah is perfectly prepared.


THE FIRST STEP : the tea – Most importantly is to use good quality, fresh and origin packed tea of course! – Tea that is garden fresh, unblended, of Single Origin, Single Region or Single Estate and packed at source, is more authentic, but also richer in flavour and natural anti oxidants. As tea ages in ships, warehouses and as, in most cases today, when tea is blended with other teas to reduce cost, it loses freshness, absorbing moisture, developing various bacteria and in the process losing the flavour and antioxidants that nature has blessed good tea with. Since our father, Merrill J Fernando founded Dilmah, we have maintained a commitment to Single Origin Tea to offer our customer the most enjoyable and also genuinely ethical tea experience.


THE SECOND STEP : the water – Good tea needs good water. Most people think of water as ‘just water”. It is not so because there is hard water, chlorinated water, water with various chemicals, including fluoride, water with natural minerals including calcium, which could significantly retard the quality of tea. Generally, if you live in an area where the water is hard, heavily chlorinated, with fluoride or calcium, we suggest that you use a water filter. Brita is one brand whose filters we have tested and found to be effective in removing impurities in water. The perfect option though, especially for Seasonal Flush is of course natural spring water. Evian and Highland Spring are brands that we can suggest although there are other good quality spring water brands depending on where you live.


THE THIRD STEP : boiling – The water needs to be boiled in a clean and a dry kettle. Boil just once since excessive boiling causes the water to lose carbon dioxide and oxygen which are important elements in the exaction and presentation of flavour and character in tea. Water that has been boiled continuously or boiled several times loses these dissolved gasses and can acquire an unpleasant metallic taste.


THE FOURTH STEP : brewing – The freshly boiled water should them be poured on to your tea. In the case of leaf tea, 2.5 g. (approx. one heaped teaspoonful) or 1 tea bag per 220 ml. of water water. Ideally use white porcelain cups or mugs and pour the freshly, and once boiled water directly on to the teabag or leaf tea. Stir once or twice to start the brewing and then cover the cup or mug with a lid or saucer. After 2 minutes stir again and leave for a further minute.


In the case of black tea, brew for at least 3 minutes, if you would like your tea very strong, brew up to 5 minutes but no longer as your tea can become bitter if brewed for morethan 5 minutes. If you prefer your tea weak, brew for 3 minutes and then add hot water to dilute the tea to taste. It is important that you brew for at least 3 minutes in order to extract the flavour and natural goodness in tea. Diluting thereafter will meet your requirement for a weak tea if that is your preference. After brewing, strain the leaf tea using a stainless steel strainer, or remove the teabag if you are using teabags, and serve.


Offering fine tea in white Chinaware enhance the appreciation of tea by showing the hues and colours of tea properly. The spectrum of colour that tea represents extends from the pale, honey tinged liquors of White Tea to the dark and powerful infusion of PuErh. Good tea, especially rare, seasonal teas are best taken straight. Adding anything to tea compromising the subtle flavours which are delicate and complex. However if you enjoy milk with your tea, choose a strong tea like our English Breakfast, Irish Breakfast or Ceylon Supreme and add warm dairy milk.. If you enjoy sweetness in your tea, try a light honey as a substitute to sugar, in order to keep your tea as natural as possible.


The principle of adding anything to tea is based on achieving a fine balance of flavour. Our Seasonal Flush Teas offer subtle and very delicate flavour and texture, which would be ecompletely overcome by the addition of sugar, milk, honey etc. The same goes for White Tea (real white tea that is) which is supremely delicate and cannot take any additions. However, with stronger teas with body and character, a balance can be achieved. Adding a twist of Lemon or a wedge of Orange to a bright and strong Ceylon Tea like our Perfect Ceylon Tea (in the Exceptional Tea range), or to our Brilliant Breakfast (in the t-Series, designer gourmet tea) can enhance your tea experience for the character and personality of the tea is not compromised but enhance. The taste of tea is in harmony with the taste of the Lemon or Orange.



 
   

How to brew a perfect cup of tea

 

hat you will learn

  • How to brew a perfect cup of tea
  • How to serve a fine cup of tea
  • How to advice guest and give recommendations  via a menu on the tea selection
  • Give recommendations to guest on food pairing with tea
  • Create your own tea experience


Module Overview

1. The finer points in brewing

1.1.    The importance of water

1.2.    Water temperature

1.3.    How much tea to be used

1.4.    How much water

1.5.    Brewing times

1.6.    Adding enhancements


2. Brewing tea

2.1.    Luxury leaf tea bags

2.2.    Leaf Tea


3.   Serving and experiencing tea

2.3.    Professional tea set

2.4.    Tall tea glass with strainer

2.5.    Thetiere – Plunger

2.6.    Tea cup and pot


4. Summary of videos and presentations

  • Finer points in brewing video
  • Essential information for a tea service


5. Examination

  • Finer points in brewing



BREWING THE PERFECT CUP OF TEA

There is only one right way to brew tea. Most tea drinkers fail ensure the quality of tea in their cup and in the process lose the pleasure and natural goodness in tea. Please follow our simple guidelines to ensure that your cup of Dilmah is perfectly prepared.


THE FIRST STEP : the tea – Most importantly is to use good quality, fresh and origin packed tea of course! – Tea that is garden fresh, unblended, of Single Origin, Single Region or Single Estate and packed at source, is more authentic, but also richer in flavour and natural anti oxidants. As tea ages in ships, warehouses and as, in most cases today, when tea is blended with other teas to reduce cost, it loses freshness, absorbing moisture, developing various bacteria and in the process losing the flavour and antioxidants that nature has blessed good tea with. Since our father, Merrill J Fernando founded Dilmah, we have maintained a commitment to Single Origin Tea to offer our customer the most enjoyable and also genuinely ethical tea experience.


THE SECOND STEP : the water – Good tea needs good water. Most people think of water as ‘just water”. It is not so because there is hard water, chlorinated water, water with various chemicals, including fluoride, water with natural minerals including calcium, which could significantly retard the quality of tea. Generally, if you live in an area where the water is hard, heavily chlorinated, with fluoride or calcium, we suggest that you use a water filter. Brita is one brand whose filters we have tested and found to be effective in removing impurities in water. The perfect option though, especially for Seasonal Flush is of course natural spring water. Evian and Highland Spring are brands that we can suggest although there are other good quality spring water brands depending on where you live.


THE THIRD STEP : boiling – The water needs to be boiled in a clean and a dry kettle. Boil just once since excessive boiling causes the water to lose carbon dioxide and oxygen which are important elements in the exaction and presentation of flavour and character in tea. Water that has been boiled continuously or boiled several times loses these dissolved gasses and can acquire an unpleasant metallic taste.


THE FOURTH STEP : brewing – The freshly boiled water should them be poured on to your tea. In the case of leaf tea, 2.5 g. (approx. one heaped teaspoonful) or 1 tea bag per 220 ml. of water water. Ideally use white porcelain cups or mugs and pour the freshly, and once boiled water directly on to the teabag or leaf tea. Stir once or twice to start the brewing and then cover the cup or mug with a lid or saucer. After 2 minutes stir again and leave for a further minute.


In the case of black tea, brew for at least 3 minutes, if you would like your tea very strong, brew up to 5 minutes but no longer as your tea can become bitter if brewed for morethan 5 minutes. If you prefer your tea weak, brew for 3 minutes and then add hot water to dilute the tea to taste. It is important that you brew for at least 3 minutes in order to extract the flavour and natural goodness in tea. Diluting thereafter will meet your requirement for a weak tea if that is your preference. After brewing, strain the leaf tea using a stainless steel strainer, or remove the teabag if you are using teabags, and serve.


Offering fine tea in white Chinaware enhance the appreciation of tea by showing the hues and colours of tea properly. The spectrum of colour that tea represents extends from the pale, honey tinged liquors of White Tea to the dark and powerful infusion of PuErh. Good tea, especially rare, seasonal teas are best taken straight. Adding anything to tea compromising the subtle flavours which are delicate and complex. However if you enjoy milk with your tea, choose a strong tea like our English Breakfast, Irish Breakfast or Ceylon Supreme and add warm dairy milk.. If you enjoy sweetness in your tea, try a light honey as a substitute to sugar, in order to keep your tea as natural as possible.


The principle of adding anything to tea is based on achieving a fine balance of flavour. Our Seasonal Flush Teas offer subtle and very delicate flavour and texture, which would be ecompletely overcome by the addition of sugar, milk, honey etc. The same goes for White Tea (real white tea that is) which is supremely delicate and cannot take any additions. However, with stronger teas with body and character, a balance can be achieved. Adding a twist of Lemon or a wedge of Orange to a bright and strong Ceylon Tea like our Perfect Ceylon Tea (in the Exceptional Tea range), or to our Brilliant Breakfast (in the t-Series, designer gourmet tea) can enhance your tea experience for the character and personality of the tea is not compromised but enhance. The taste of tea is in harmony with the taste of the Lemon or Orange.



How to brew a perfect cup of tea

 

hat you will learn

  • How to brew a perfect cup of tea
  • How to serve a fine cup of tea
  • How to advice guest and give recommendations  via a menu on the tea selection
  • Give recommendations to guest on food pairing with tea
  • Create your own tea experience


Module Overview

1. The finer points in brewing

1.1.    The importance of water

1.2.    Water temperature

1.3.    How much tea to be used

1.4.    How much water

1.5.    Brewing times

1.6.    Adding enhancements


2. Brewing tea

2.1.    Luxury leaf tea bags

2.2.    Leaf Tea


3.   Serving and experiencing tea

2.3.    Professional tea set

2.4.    Tall tea glass with strainer

2.5.    Thetiere – Plunger

2.6.    Tea cup and pot


4. Summary of videos and presentations

  • Finer points in brewing video
  • Essential information for a tea service


5. Examination

  • Finer points in brewing



BREWING THE PERFECT CUP OF TEA

There is only one right way to brew tea. Most tea drinkers fail ensure the quality of tea in their cup and in the process lose the pleasure and natural goodness in tea. Please follow our simple guidelines to ensure that your cup of Dilmah is perfectly prepared.


THE FIRST STEP : the tea – Most importantly is to use good quality, fresh and origin packed tea of course! – Tea that is garden fresh, unblended, of Single Origin, Single Region or Single Estate and packed at source, is more authentic, but also richer in flavour and natural anti oxidants. As tea ages in ships, warehouses and as, in most cases today, when tea is blended with other teas to reduce cost, it loses freshness, absorbing moisture, developing various bacteria and in the process losing the flavour and antioxidants that nature has blessed good tea with. Since our father, Merrill J Fernando founded Dilmah, we have maintained a commitment to Single Origin Tea to offer our customer the most enjoyable and also genuinely ethical tea experience.


THE SECOND STEP : the water – Good tea needs good water. Most people think of water as ‘just water”. It is not so because there is hard water, chlorinated water, water with various chemicals, including fluoride, water with natural minerals including calcium, which could significantly retard the quality of tea. Generally, if you live in an area where the water is hard, heavily chlorinated, with fluoride or calcium, we suggest that you use a water filter. Brita is one brand whose filters we have tested and found to be effective in removing impurities in water. The perfect option though, especially for Seasonal Flush is of course natural spring water. Evian and Highland Spring are brands that we can suggest although there are other good quality spring water brands depending on where you live.


THE THIRD STEP : boiling – The water needs to be boiled in a clean and a dry kettle. Boil just once since excessive boiling causes the water to lose carbon dioxide and oxygen which are important elements in the exaction and presentation of flavour and character in tea. Water that has been boiled continuously or boiled several times loses these dissolved gasses and can acquire an unpleasant metallic taste.


THE FOURTH STEP : brewing – The freshly boiled water should them be poured on to your tea. In the case of leaf tea, 2.5 g. (approx. one heaped teaspoonful) or 1 tea bag per 220 ml. of water water. Ideally use white porcelain cups or mugs and pour the freshly, and once boiled water directly on to the teabag or leaf tea. Stir once or twice to start the brewing and then cover the cup or mug with a lid or saucer. After 2 minutes stir again and leave for a further minute.


In the case of black tea, brew for at least 3 minutes, if you would like your tea very strong, brew up to 5 minutes but no longer as your tea can become bitter if brewed for morethan 5 minutes. If you prefer your tea weak, brew for 3 minutes and then add hot water to dilute the tea to taste. It is important that you brew for at least 3 minutes in order to extract the flavour and natural goodness in tea. Diluting thereafter will meet your requirement for a weak tea if that is your preference. After brewing, strain the leaf tea using a stainless steel strainer, or remove the teabag if you are using teabags, and serve.


Offering fine tea in white Chinaware enhance the appreciation of tea by showing the hues and colours of tea properly. The spectrum of colour that tea represents extends from the pale, honey tinged liquors of White Tea to the dark and powerful infusion of PuErh. Good tea, especially rare, seasonal teas are best taken straight. Adding anything to tea compromising the subtle flavours which are delicate and complex. However if you enjoy milk with your tea, choose a strong tea like our English Breakfast, Irish Breakfast or Ceylon Supreme and add warm dairy milk.. If you enjoy sweetness in your tea, try a light honey as a substitute to sugar, in order to keep your tea as natural as possible.


The principle of adding anything to tea is based on achieving a fine balance of flavour. Our Seasonal Flush Teas offer subtle and very delicate flavour and texture, which would be ecompletely overcome by the addition of sugar, milk, honey etc. The same goes for White Tea (real white tea that is) which is supremely delicate and cannot take any additions. However, with stronger teas with body and character, a balance can be achieved. Adding a twist of Lemon or a wedge of Orange to a bright and strong Ceylon Tea like our Perfect Ceylon Tea (in the Exceptional Tea range), or to our Brilliant Breakfast (in the t-Series, designer gourmet tea) can enhance your tea experience for the character and personality of the tea is not compromised but enhance. The taste of tea is in harmony with the taste of the Lemon or Orange.



t Series Brewing a perfect cup of t luxury leaf tea bag

t Series training Brewing Cuppa t in porcelain

t Series training Brewing instruction

flv:http://www.schooloftea.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/t%20Series%20training%20Brewing%20Tall%20Tea%20Glass%20with%20strainer%202min40seconds.flv 320 240]

t Series training Brewing Tall Tea Glass with strainer

t Series training Finer points for brewing

t Series training Professional t service

t Series training Serving suggestions

When..

 

The first school

 

School of Tea 2010

 

Dilmah School of Tea Videos

 
School of Tea, Intermediate Certificate Course –November 2012
  School of Tea – May 2012
Tea Mixology Tea-The New Wine Basics-Cooking With Tea
Tea & Cheese Pairing
  School of Tea-2010    Day 1 – 31st July  
Welcome address Its not size that really matters CTC
Different categories of tea Seasonal Flush From Cognac and Wine to Tea
Celebration of terrior in tea Tasting different types of tea Not quite white
Balancing the Flavours The importance of freshness Group quiz
One tea two personalities Make your own tea Explanation of The
  Day 2 – 1st August  
Delighting the Consumer in Tea Tea & Gastronomy Suggested matching of food with tea
Matching teas and cheese Tea Culinary Tea with Chocolates
How to present an award winning afternoon tea Tea Mixlong new Tea Mixlong new
Tea Mixology 2 Make your own Concoction Presentation of Certificates
 

Sample Video Gallery

 

Require Flash player


Dilmah School of Tea Videos

 

School of Tea, Intermediate Certificate Course –November 2012

 

School of Tea – May 2012

Tea Mixology Tea-The New Wine Basics-Cooking With Tea
Tea & Cheese Pairing

 

School of Tea-2010

 

 Day 1 – 31st July

 

Welcome address Its not size that really matters CTC
Different categories of tea Seasonal Flush From Cognac and Wine to Tea
Celebration of terrior in tea Tasting different types of tea Not quite white
Balancing the Flavours The importance of freshness Group quiz
One tea two personalities Make your own tea Explanation of The

 

Day 2 – 1st August

 

Delighting the Consumer in Tea Tea & Gastronomy Suggested matching of food with tea
Matching teas and cheese Tea Culinary Tea with Chocolates
How to present an award winning
afternoon tea
Tea Mixlong new Tea Mixlong new
Tea Mixology 2 Make your own Concoction Presentation of Certificates

 

Dilmah School of Tea Videos

 

School of Tea, Intermediate Certificate Course –November 2012

 

School of Tea – May 2012

Tea Mixology Tea-The New Wine Basics-Cooking With Tea
Tea & Cheese Pairing

 

School of Tea-2010

 

 Day 1 – 31st July

 

Welcome address Its not size that really matters CTC
Different categories of tea Seasonal Flush From Cognac and Wine to Tea
Celebration of terrior in tea Tasting different types of tea Not quite white
Balancing the Flavours The importance of freshness Group quiz
One tea two personalities Make your own tea Explanation of The

 

Day 2 – 1st August

 

Delighting the Consumer in Tea Tea & Gastronomy Suggested matching of food with tea
Matching teas and cheese Tea Culinary Tea with Chocolates
How to present an award winningafternoon tea Tea Mixlong new Tea Mixlong new
Tea Mixology 2 Make your own Concoction Presentation of Certificates

 

Dilmah School of Tea Videos

 

School of Tea, Intermediate Certificate Course –November 2012

 

School of Tea – May 2012

Tea Mixology Tea-The New Wine Basics-Cooking With Tea
Tea & Cheese Pairing

 

School of Tea-2010

 

 Day 1 – 31st July

 

Welcome address Its not size that really matters CTC
Different categories of tea Seasonal Flush From Cognac and Wine to Tea
Celebration of terrior in tea Tasting different types of tea Not quite white
Balancing the Flavours The importance of freshness Group quiz
One tea two personalities Make your own tea Explanation of The

 

Day 2 – 1st August

 

Delighting the Consumer in Tea Tea & Gastronomy Suggested matching of food with tea
Matching teas and cheese Tea Culinary Tea with Chocolates
How to present an award winningafternoon tea Tea Mixlong new Tea Mixlong new
Tea Mixology 2 Make your own Concoction Presentation of Certificates

 

Dilmah School of Tea Videos

 

School of Tea, Intermediate Certificate Course –November 2012

 

School of Tea – May 2012

Tea Mixology Tea-The New Wine Basics-Cooking With Tea
Tea & Cheese Pairing

 

School of Tea-2010

 

 Day 1 – 31st July

 

Welcome address Its not size that really matters CTC
Different categories of tea Seasonal Flush From Cognac and Wine to Tea
Celebration of terrior in tea Tasting different types of tea Not quite white
Balancing the Flavours The importance of freshness Group quiz
One tea two personalities Make your own tea Explanation of The

 

Day 2 – 1st August

 

Delighting the Consumer in Tea Tea & Gastronomy Suggested matching of food with tea
Matching teas and cheese Tea Culinary Tea with Chocolates
How to present an award winningafternoon tea Tea Mixlong new Tea Mixlong new
Tea Mixology 2 Make your own Concoction Presentation of Certificates

 

Dilmah School of Tea Videos

 

School of Tea, Intermediate Certificate Course –November 2012

 

School of Tea – May 2012

Tea Mixology Tea-The New Wine Basics-Cooking With Tea
Tea & Cheese Pairing

 

School of Tea-2010

 

 Day 1 – 31st July

 

Welcome address Its not size that really matters CTC
Different categories of tea Seasonal Flush From Cognac and Wine to Tea
Celebration of terrior in tea Tasting different types of tea Not quite white
Balancing the Flavours The importance of freshness Group quiz
One tea two personalities Make your own tea Explanation of The

 

Day 2 – 1st August

 

Delighting the Consumer in Tea Tea & Gastronomy Suggested matching of food with tea
Matching teas and cheese Tea Culinary Tea with Chocolates
How to present an award winningafternoon tea Tea Mixlong new Tea Mixlong new
Tea Mixology 2 Make your own Concoction Presentation of Certificates

 

Dilmah School of Tea Videos

 

School of Tea, Intermediate Certificate Course –November 2012

 

School of Tea – May 2012

Tea Mixology Tea-The New Wine Basics-Cooking With Tea
Tea & Cheese Pairing

 

School of Tea-2010

 

 Day 1 – 31st July

 

Welcome address Its not size that really matters CTC
Different categories of tea Seasonal Flush From Cognac and Wine to Tea
Celebration of terrior in tea Tasting different types of tea Not quite white
Balancing the Flavours The importance of freshness Group quiz
One tea two personalities Make your own tea Explanation of The

 

Day 2 – 1st August

 

Delighting the Consumer in Tea Tea & Gastronomy Suggested matching of food with tea
Matching teas and cheese Tea Culinary Tea with Chocolates
How to present an award winningafternoon tea Tea Mixlong new Tea Mixlong new
Tea Mixology 2 Make your own Concoction Presentation of Certificates